Etymology
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ordinate (adj.)

late 14c., "regular, normal," of behavior, thoughts, etc., "properly directed, proper," from Latin ordinatus, past participle of ordinare "arrange, set in order," from ordo (genitive ordinis) "row, rank, series, arrangement" (see order (n.)). Related: Ordinately.

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coniferous (adj.)

"bearing cones," also, later, "belonging to the order Coniferae," 1660s; see conifer + -ous.

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coordination (n.)

also co-ordination, c. 1600, "orderly combination," from French coordination (14c.) or directly from Medieval Latin coordinationem (nominative coordinatio), noun of action from past-participle stem of Latin coordinare "to set in order, arrange," from co- "with, together" (see com-) + ordinatio "arrangement," from ordo "row, rank, series, arrangement" (see order (n.)). Meaning "action of setting in order" is from 1640s; that of "harmonious adjustment or action," especially of muscles and bodily movements, is from 1855.

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syntax (n.)

c. 1600, from French syntaxe (16c.) and directly from Late Latin syntaxis, from Greek syntaxis "a putting together or in order, arrangement, a grammatical construction," from stem of syntassein "put in order," from syn- "together" (see syn-) + tassein "arrange" (see tactics).

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sluttery (n.)

"neglect of cleanliness and order," 1580s, from slut + -ery. From 1841 as "an untidy room."

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police (v.)
Origin and meaning of police

1580s, "to watch, guard, or keep order; to govern," from French policer, from police (see police (n.)). The original sense is obsolete. The meaning "to control or keep order in by means of police" is from 1837; figurative use by 1885. Related: Policed; policing.

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black friar (n.)

"friar of the Dominican order," c. 1500, so called from the color of their dress.

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tidy (v.)

"to make neat, set in order," 1821, from tidy (adj.). Related: Tidied; tidying.

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disorderly (adj.)

1580s, "opposed to moral order, disposed to violate the restraints of public morality;" also "opposed to legal authority, disposed to violate law;" see disorder (n.) + -ly (1). The meaning "untidy, being out of proper order" is attested from 1630s; the older senses are those in disorderly house, disorderly conduct, etc.

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taxis (n.)

"operation whereby displaced parts are put back in their natural situation," 1758, medical Latin, from Greek taxis "arrangement, an arranging, the order or disposition of an army, battle array; order, regularity," verbal noun of tassein "arrange," from PIE root *tag- "to touch, handle."

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