Etymology
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piecework (n.)

also piece-work, "work done and paid for by measure or quantity" in contradistinction to work done and paid for by measure of time, 1540s, from piece (n.1) + work (n.) in the sense of "a distinct job or operation taken separately." Related: Pieceworker.

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educe (v.)
early 15c., in the literal sense, "to draw out, extract; branch out," from Latin educere "to lead out, bring out" (troops, ships, etc.; see educate). Meaning "bring into view or operation" is from c. 1600. Meaning "to draw a conclusion from data" is from 1837.
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energetic (adj.)
1650s, "powerful in operation," from Greek energetikos "active," from energein "to work, be in action, act upon" (see energy). Of persons, "active," in English from 1796 (energetical "operative" is from c. 1600; from 1630s as "full of energy," while energical is attested from 1560s). Related: Energetically.
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bypass (n.)
also by-pass, 1848, "small pipe passing around a valve in a gasworks" (for a pilot light, etc.), from the verbal phrase; see by + pass (v.). First used 1922 for "road for the relief of congestion;" figurative sense is from 1928. The heart operation was first so called 1957.
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A&P 
original U.S. grocery chain and leading food retailer of the mid-20c., the abbreviation by 1875, originally The Great Atlantic and Pacific Tea Company, which grew out of a New York firm founded 1859 by George Gilman and subsequently expanded by George Huntington Hartford. It ceased operation in 2015.
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push-button (adj.)

"characterized by the use of push-buttons," 1945, originally of military systems, earlier "operated by push-buttons" (1903), from push-button (n.) "button pressed with the finger to effect some operation," 1865, from push (v.) + button (n.). Earlier adjective was press-button (1892), from the noun (1879).

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override (v.)

Middle English overriden, from Old English oferridan "to ride across, ride through or over," from ofer "over" (see over) + ridan "to ride" (see ride (v.)). Originally literal, of cavalry, etc. Figurative meaning "to set aside arrogantly" is by 1827, from the notion of "to trample down," hence "supersede." The mechanical sense "to suspend automatic operation" is attested from 1946. As a noun in the sense "act or process of suspending automatic operation," from 1946. Related: Overrode; overriding; overridden.

And þanne þeze Frenschmen come prikkyng doun as þei wolde haue ouyr-rydyn alle oure meyne; but God and our archers made hem sone to stomble. [Layamon, from the description of the Battle of Agincourt in "The Brut, or The Chronicles of England"] 
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prime (v.)

"to fill, charge, load" (a weapon, before firing), 1510s, probably from prime (adj.). General sense of "perform the first operation on, prepare (something, especially wood, etc., for painting)" is from c. 1600. To prime a pump (1769) meant to pour water down the tube, which saturated the sucking mechanism and made it draw up water more readily. Related: Primed; priming.

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reposition (n.)

early 15c. (Chauliac), reposicioun, in medicine, "a placing, putting, act of replacing, operation of restoring (something) to its original position," from Late Latin repositionem (nominative repositio) "a laying up, a storing up," noun of action from past-participle stem of Latin reponere (see repose (v.2)). Meaning "act of laying up in safety" is from 1610s; that of "reinstatement" (of a person, to an office, etc.)
is from 1640s.

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debris (n.)

"accumulation of loose matter or rubbish from some destructive operation or process," 1708, from French débris "remains, waste, rubbish" (16c.), from obsolete debriser "break down, crush," from Old French de- (see de-) + briser "to break," from Late Latin brisare, which is possibly of Gaulish origin (compare Old Irish brissim "I break").

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