Etymology
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onerous (adj.)

"burdensome, troublesome," late 14c., from Old French onereus, honereus (14c., Modern French onéreux) and directly from Latin onerosus "burdensome, heavy, oppressive," from onus (genitive oneris) "a burden" (see onus). Related: Onerously; onerousness.

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oneiro- 

before vowels oneir-, word-forming element meaning "of or pertaining to a dream or dreams," from Greek oneiros "a dream," a word of uncertain origin, perhaps related to Armenian anurj, Albanian (Gheg) âdërrë.

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uni- 
word-forming element meaning "having one only," from Latin uni-, combining form of unus "one" (from PIE root *oi-no- "one, unique").
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triune (adj.)
"three in one," 1630s, from tri- + Latin unus "one" (from PIE root *oi-no- "one, unique"). Related: Triunity.
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une (v.)
"to unite," c. 1400, from Late Latin unire "to make into one" (transitive), from unus "one" (from PIE root *oi-no- "one, unique").
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single (adj.)
early 14c., "unmarried," from Old French sengle, sangle "alone, unaccompanied; simple, unadorned," from Latin singulus "one, one to each, individual, separate" (usually in plural singuli "one by one"), from PIE *semgolo‑, suffixed (diminutive?) form of root *sem- (1) "one; as one, together with." Meaning "consisting of one unit, individual, unaccompanied by others" is from late 14c. Meaning "undivided" is from 1580s. Single-parent (adj.) is attested from 1966.
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hyphen (n.)
"short dash used to connect two words or separate one," 1620s, from Late Latin hyphen, from Greek hyphen "mark joining two syllables or words," probably indicating how they were to be said or sung. This was a noun use of an adverb meaning "together, in one," literally "under one," from hypo "under" (from PIE root *upo "under") + hen, neuter of heis "one," from PIE root *sem- (1) "one; as one, together with."
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unanimous (adj.)
1610s, from Latin unanimus "of one mind, in union," from unus "one" (from PIE root *oi-no- "one, unique") + animus "mind, spirit" (see animus). Related: Unanimously.
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attendee (n.)
"one who attends" (something), 1951, from attend + -ee. Attender (mid-15c. as "observer," 1704 as "one who attends") and attendant (1640s as "one present at a public proceeding") are older, but they had overtones of "one who waits upon."
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centi- 
word-forming element meaning "one hundred" or "one hundredth part," used in English from c. 1800, from the French metric system, from Latin centi-, combining form of centum "one hundred" (see hundred).
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