Etymology
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manitou (n.)

also manito, "spirit, object of religious awe or reverence, deity, supernatural being," 1690s, from a word found throughout the Algonquian languages (Delaware manutoow, Ojibwa manidoo), first in English from Unami Delaware /manet:u/.

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steady (n.)
1792, "a steady thing or place," from steady (adj.). From 1885 as "something that holds another object steady." Meaning "one's boyfriend or girlfriend" is from 1897; to go steady is 1905 in teenager slang.
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thump (v.)
1530s, "to strike hard," probably imitative of the sound made by hitting with a heavy object (compare East Frisian dump "a knock," Swedish dialectal dumpa "to make a noise"). Related: Thumped; thumping.
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dingus (n.)

"any unspecified or unspecifiable object; something one does not know the name of or does not wish to name," by 1874, U.S. slang, from Dutch dinges, literally "thing" (see thing).

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nursling (n.)

also nurseling, "object of a nurse's care, one who is nursed, an infant," 1550s, from nurse (v.) + -ling. Earlier was norseling, in alchemy, "a substance in a preparatory stage" (c. 1500).

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OMG (interj.)

also omg, internet chat abbreviation of oh my God, by 1994. (Earlier in computerese it meant Object Management Group, 1989, a consortium which helped pave the way for the modern internet.)

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heed (n.)
"careful attention, notice, regard," early 14c., from heed (v.). Survives only in literary use, in compounds, and as the object of verbs (take heed, etc.).
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verso (n.)
"reverse, back, or other side of some object," especially a printed page or book, 1839, from Latin verso (folio), ablative singular neuter of versus, past participle of vertere "to turn" (from PIE root *wer- (2) "to turn, bend").
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caber (n.)
pole used in housebuilding, especially as an object tossed in the Highland games, 1510s, from Gaelic cabar "pole, spar," cognate with Irish cabar "lath," Welsh ceibr "beam, rafter."
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marquetry (n.)

"inlay of some thin material in the surface of a piece of furniture or other object," 1560s, from French marqueterie "inlaid work," from marqueter "to checker" (14c.), frequentative of marquer, from marque "mark," which is probably from a Germanic source (see mark (n.1)).

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