Etymology
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conk (v.)

as in conk out, 1918, coined by World War I airmen, perhaps in imitation of the sound of a stalling motor, reinforced by conk (v.) "hit on the head," originally "punch in the nose" (1821), from conk (n.), slang for "nose" (1812), perhaps from fancied resemblance of the nose to a conch (pronounced "conk") shell. Perhaps also imitative: Compare Greek konk, a syllable representing the sound made by a pebble striking the bottom of the (metal) voting urn [William Smith, "Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities"].

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snuff (v.2)
"draw in through the nose," 1520s, from Dutch or Flemish snuffen "to sniff, snuff," related to Dutch snuiven "to sniff," from Proto-Germanic *snuf- (source also of Middle High German snupfe, German Schnupfen "head-cold"), imitative of the sound of drawing air through the nose (see snout). Related: Snuffed; snuffing.
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schnozz (n.)
"nose," 1942, from Yiddish shnoitsl, from German Schnauze "snout" (see schnauzer).
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pit-viper (n.)

venomous serpent, so called from the characteristic depression between the eyes and the nose, by 1872, from pit (n.1) + viper.

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retrousse (adj.)

"turned up (of the nose), pug," 1802, from French (nez) retroussé (16c.), past-participle adjective from retrousser "to turn up."

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ness (n.)

"point of land running into the sea," obsolete except in place names (Holderness, Dungeness, etc.) and surnames, Old English næs (West Saxon, Northumbrian), nes (Mercian, Kentish), "a promontory," related to nasu "nose" (from PIE root *nas- "nose"). Cognate with and probably partly from Old Norse nes, Danish næs; also Swedish näs, Middle Dutch nesse.

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coryza (n.)

"acute inflammation of the mucous membranes of the nose, eyes, etc., a head-cold," 1630s, medical Latin, from Latinized form of Greek koryza "running at the nose," which is of uncertain etymology. It is traditionally compared to Germanic words for "mucus," such as Old English hrot, Old High German (h)roz "mucus" which are verbal nouns from Old English hrutan, Old High German hruzzan "to grumble, snore."

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ceratosaurus (n.)

meat-eating dinosaur of the Jurassic period, 1884, from cerato- "horn" + -saurus. So called for the small horn on its nose.

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snorkel (n.)
1944, "airshaft for submarines," from German Schnorchel, from German navy slang Schnorchel "nose, snout," related to schnarchen "to snore" (see snore (n.)). So called from its resemblance to a nose and its noise when in use. The Englished spelling first recorded 1949. The meaning "curved tube used by a swimmer to breathe under water" is first recorded 1951.
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eye-candy (n.)
also eye candy, "attractive woman on a TV show, etc.," by 1978, based on a metaphor also found in nose candy "cocaine" (1930).
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