Etymology
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crow (v.)

Old English crawan "make a loud noise like a crow," probably imitative (see crow (n.)). Compare Dutch kraaijen, German krähen. From mid-13c. as "make a loud noise like a cock," which oddly has become the main sense, the use of the word in reference to crows (and cranes) having faded. Sense of "exult in triumph" is from 1520s, probably an image of the cock's crow, but perhaps also in part because the English crow is a carrion-eater. Related: Crowed; crowing. As a noun, "characteristic cry of the cock," also "the crowing of the cock at dawn," c. 1200.

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crepitus (n.)

"a crackling noise," c. 1820, from Latin crepitus "a rattling, creaking;" another word for crepitation, which is from the same root. Compare Latin crepitaculum, name of an ancient instrument resembling the castanets.

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bombinate (v.)
"make a buzzing noise," 1865, from Latin bombinare, corrupted from bombitare "to hum, buzz," from bombus "a deep, hollow sound; hum, buzz," echoic. Also sometimes bombilate. Related: Bombinated; bombinating.
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crackle (v.)

"make frequent or rapid cracking noises," mid-15c., crackelen, frequentative of cracken "to crack" (see crack (v.)). Related: Crackled; crackling. The noun, in the sense of "a crackling noise," is recorded from 1833.

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bleep (n.)
"electronic noise," 1953 (originally in reference to a Geiger counter), imitative; later associated with Sputnik. As "bleeping sound edited over a spoken word deemed unfit for broadcast" from 1968.
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bang (n.)

1540s, "heavy, resounding blow;" see bang (v.). Meaning "loud, sudden explosive noise" is by 1855.

This is the way the world ends
Not with a bang but a whimper
[T.S. Eliot, from "Hollow Men," 1925]
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squib (n.)
1520s, "short bit of sarcastic writing, witty scoff," of unknown origin. If the meaning "small firework that burns with a hissing noise" (also 1520s) is the original one, the word might be imitative.
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*swen- 

also swenə-, Proto-Indo-European root meaning "to sound." 

It forms all or part of: assonance; consonant; dissonant; resound; sonant; sonata; sone; sonic; sonnet; sonogram; sonorous; sound (n.1) "noise, what is heard;" sound (v.1) "to be audible;" swan; unison.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Sanskrit svanati "it sounds," svanah "sound, tone;" Latin sonus "sound, a noise," sonare "to sound;" Old Irish senim "the playing of an instrument;" Old English geswin "music, song," swinsian "to sing;" Old Norse svanr, Old English swan "swan," properly "the sounding bird."

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hubbub (n.)
1550s, whobub "confused noise," of uncertain origin; according to OED generally believed to be of Irish origin, perhaps from Gaelic ub!, expression of aversion or contempt, or Old Irish battle cry abu, from buide "victory."
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grunion (n.)
type of Pacific fish, 1901, from American Spanish gruñon "grunting fish," from grunir "to grunt," from Latin grunnire, from Greek gryzein "to grunt," from gry "a grunt," imitative. Compare the unrelated American fish called the grunt, "so called from the noise they make when taken."
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