Etymology
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nyctophobia (n.)

"fear of the night or darkness," 1885, medical Latin, from nycto-, variant of nycti- "night, darkness" + -phobia "fear." Related: Nyctophobic.

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sightless (adj.)
late 13c., from sight (n.) + -less. Related: Sightlessly; sightlessness.
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insight (n.)
c. 1200, innsihht, "sight with the 'eyes' of the mind, mental vision, understanding from within," from in (prep.) + sight (n.). But the meaning often seems to be felt as "sight into" (something else), and so the sense shifted to "penetrating understanding into character or hidden nature" (1580s). Similar formation in Dutch inzigt, German einsicht, Danish indsigt.
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nightshade (n.)

"plant of the genus solanum," with white flowers and black poisonous berries, Middle English night-shade, from Old English nihtscada, literally "shade of night," perhaps in allusion to the berries; see night + shade (n.). A common Germanic compound, cognates: Dutch nachtschade, German Nachtschatten.

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equinox (n.)
c. 1400, "point at which the sun crosses the earth's equator, making day and night of equal length everywhere," from Old French equinoce (12c.) or directly from Medieval Latin equinoxium "equality of night (and day)," from Latin aequinoctium, usually in plural, dies aequinoctii "the equinoxes," from aequus "equal" (see equal (adj.)) + nox (genitive noctis) "night" (see night). The Old English translation was efnniht. Related: Equinoctial.
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short-sighted (adj.)

also shortsighted, 1640s, of eyesight, "myopic, having distinct vision only when an object is near;" 1620s in the sense "lacking foresight, not considering remote consequences;" see short (adj.) + sight (n.). The noun short-sight is attested from 1820s. Related: Shortsightedly; shortsightedness.

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noctuary (n.)

"account of what passes in the night," the converse of a diary, 1714; as though from Latin *noctuarius; see noct- "night." A word in use 18c.-19c.

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audiovisual (adj.)

also audio-visual, "pertaining to or involving both sound and sight," 1937, from audio- + visual.

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Leila 
fem. proper name, from Arabic Laylah, from laylah "night."
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