Etymology
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Tass (n.)

official news agency of the former U.S.S.R., formed in 1925, an acronym of Russian T'el'egrafnoye ag'enstvo Sov'etskovo Soyuza  "Telegraphic Agency of the Soviet Union."

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Job 

Biblical masc. proper name, name of an ancient patriarch whose story forms a book of the Old Testament, from Hebrew Iyyobh, which according to some scholars is literally "hated, persecuted," from ayyabh "he was hostile to," related to ebhah "enmity." Others say it means "the penitent one." Figurative of bad news, destitution, and patient endurance. Hence Job's comforter, of one who brings news of additional misfortune (1736).

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leg-work (n.)

also legwork, 1891, from leg (n.) + work (n.). Originally news reporter slang for an assignment that promised more walking than copy.

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reporting (n.)

mid-15c., "a written document," verbal noun from report (v.). By 1861 as "newspaper work involving gathering information and writing accounts for publication."

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noise (v.)

late 14c., noisen, "to praise; to talk loudly about, spread by rumor or report," from noise (n.) or from Old French noisier, from the noun in French. Related: Noised; noising.

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evangelism (n.)

1620s, "the preaching of the gospel," from evangel + -ism, or else from Medieval Latin evangelismus "a spreading of the Gospel," from Late Latin evangelium "good news, gospel," from Greek euangelion (see evangelist). In reference to evangelical Protestantism, from 1812.

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noise (n.)

c. 1200, "sound of a musical instrument;" mid-13c., "loud speech, outcry, clamor, shouting;" c. 1300, "a sound of any kind from any source," especially a loud and disagreeable sound, from Old French noise "din, disturbance, uproar, brawl" (11c., in modern French only in phrase chercher noise "to pick a quarrel"), also "rumor, report, news," a word of uncertain origin, replacing Replaced native gedyn (see din).

According to some, it is from Latin nausea "disgust, annoyance, discomfort," literally "seasickness" (see nausea). According to others, it is from Latin noxia "hurting, injury, damage." OED considers that "the sense of the word is against both suggestions," but nausea could have developed a sense in Vulgar Latin of "unpleasant situation, noise, quarrel" (compare Old Provençal nauza "noise, quarrel"). Confusion with annoy, noisome, and other similar words seems to have occurred.

From c. 1300 as "a disturbance; report, rumor, scandal." In Middle English sometimes also "a pleasant sound." In 16c.-17c. "a band or company of musicians." Noises off, as a stage instruction in theater, "sound effects, usually loud and confused, made off stage but to be heard by the audience as part of the play," is by 1908.

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vandalism (n.)

1794, from French vandalisme, first used by Henri Grégoire, Bishop of Blois, in a report decrying the pillage and destruction of art in the course of the French Revolution; see vandal + -ism.

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expertise (n.)

"quality or state of being an expert," 1868, from French expertise (16c.) "expert appraisal, expert's report," from expert (see expert (adj.)). Earlier and more English was expertness (c. 1600).

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intelligencer (n.)

1580s, "spy, informant," agent noun from intelligence. Perhaps modeled on French intelligencier or Italian intelligentiere. Meaning "bringer of news, one who conveys intelligence" is from 1630s; as a newspaper name from 1640s.

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