Etymology
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caveman (n.)

also cave-man, "prehistoric human dwelling in a natural cave," 1865, from cave (n.) + man (n.). Related: Cave-woman (1904).

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Maori (n.)

"Polynesian inhabitant of New Zealand," 1843, native name, said to mean "normal, natural, ordinary, of the usual kind." As an adjective by 1849.

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orthopedist (n.)

"one skilled in curing natural deformities in the human body," 1853, from orthopedy (1840), from French orthopédie (18c.); see orthopedic + -ist.

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salt-lick (n.)

"place resorted to by animals to satisfy the natural craving for salt," 1751; see salt (n.) + lick (n.).

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miniature (adj.)

"on a small scale, much reduced from natural size," 1714, from miniature (n.). Of dog breeds, from 1889. Of golf played on a miniature course, from 1893.

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psychography (n.)

1883, "history of an individual soul; the natural history of the phenomenon of mind," from psycho- + -graphy. Earlier it meant "spirit-writing by the hand of a medium" (1863).

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wow (interj.)
1510s, Scottish, a natural expression of amazement. "This old interjection had a new popularity in the early 1900s and again during the 1960s and later" [DAS].
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womanhood (n.)
late 14c., "condition of being a woman," also "qualities or characteristics considered natural to a woman," from woman + -hood. Meaning "women collectively" is attested from 1520s.
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unstudied (adj.)
late 14c., "not made a subject of study," from un- (1) "not" + past participle of study (v.). From 1650s as "natural, not artificial."
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naturalist (n.)

"student of plants and animals," c. 1600, from French naturaliste, from natural (see natural (adj.)). Earlier "one who studies natural, rather than spiritual, things" (1580s). A Middle English word for "natural philosopher or scientist" was naturien (late 14c.).

[The naturalist on expedition, pursued by a Nile crocodile, has climbed a palm tree for safety.]

Suddenly he experienced a new shudder of terror, as he remembered an article which he had inserted in the Belfast Review, and in which he had himself declared that crocodiles climb trees like cats. He would gladly have thrown this article into the fire, but it was too late, all Belfast had read it, it had been translated into Arabic and no Oriental author had yet refuted it, not even at Crocodilopolis. [Graham's Magazine, November 1855]
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