Etymology
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Guatemala 

Central American country, from words in a native language, variously identified as Quauhtemellan "land of the eagle" or Uhatzmalha "mountain where water gushes." Related: Guatemalan.

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cayuse (n.)

"horse, Indian pony of the northern Rockies," 1841, American English, said to be a Chinook (native Pacific Northwest) word; also the name of an Indian group and language (1825); of unknown origin.

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chili (n.)

also chilli, "pod or fruit of a type of American pepper, used as a condiment," 1660s, from Nahuatl (Aztecan) chilli, native name for the peppers. Not named for the South American country. As short for chile con carne and similar dishes, attested by 1846.

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nativism (n.)

"prejudice in favor of a country's natives, promotion and protection of their interests against those of immigrants," 1845, first in reference to the U.S. anti-immigrant movement that grew into the Native American Party, from native (adj.) + -ism. Later used in other contexts. Related: Nativist; nativistic.

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Salish (n.)

self-designation of the Native American people of Montana also known as Flathead, from a term containing -ish "people." The language group that includes their tongue has been called Salishan (1886).

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Pawnee 

Native American tribes of the Caddoan family, formerly inhabiting the plains of Nebraska, 1778, from Canadian French pani, from a Siouan language, such as Oto panyi. They were removed to Indian Territory in 1876.

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Mohican 

North American native people of Algonquian stock, from Mahican (Algonquian) ma:hi:kan "people of the tidal estuary." The spelling with -o- was popularized by James Fenimore Cooper's novel (1826). Mohegan is a variant form.

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Na-Dene 

in reference to a group of related North American native languages, 1915, coined by U.S. anthropologist and linguist Edward Sapir from *-ne, a stem in the languages for "person, people," and Athabaskan Dene "person, people." "The compound term Na-dene thus designates by means of native stems the speakers of the three languages concerned, besides continuing the use of the old term Dene for the Athabaskan branch of the stock" [Sapir]. 

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timothy (n.)

1747, short for timothy grass (1736), American English name for "cat-tail grass" (Phleum pratense), a native British grass introduced to the American colonies and cultivated there from c. 1720. Said since 1765 to be so called for a certain Timothy Hanson, who is said to have promoted it in the Carolinas as an agricultural plant.

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concessionaire (n.)

"person to whom a privilege or concession has been granted," 1848, from French concessionaire "person to whom a concession has been granted," from concession, from Latin concessionem "an allowing" (see concession). Native form concessionary is attested from 1854; American English concessioner is from 1899.

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