Etymology
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poke (n.2)

"pokeweed; a strong-growing branching weed of eastern North America used in medicine and dyeing," colonial American English, from native words, possibly a confusion of similar-sounding Native American plant names; from 1630s in English as "tobacco plant," short for uppowoc (1580s), from Algonquian (Virginia) *uppowoc. Later (1708) the word is used in the sense "pokeweed," as a shortened form of puccoon, from Algonquian (Virginia) *puccoon, name of a plant used for dyeing. Native roots for "smoke" and "stain" have been proposed as the origin or origins.

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thunderbird (n.)

legendary cause of thunder in many Native American cultures, 1848, a translation of native words, such as Ojibwa (Algonquian) aninikii, Lakotah (Siouan) wakiya, Klamath /lmelmnis/. See thunder (n.) + bird (n.1). In Lakhota, "the thunderbirds call" is "the usual expression for thunder" [Bright].

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yucca (n.)

Central and South American name for the cassava plant, 1550s, from Spanish yuca, juca (late 15c.), probably from Taino, native language of Haiti.

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Cheyenne 

native American people of the Great Plains or their (Algonquian) language, 1778, from French Canadian, from Dakota Sahi'yena, a diminutive of Sahi'ya, a Dakotan name for the Cree people.

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Guatemala 

Central American country, from words in a native language, variously identified as Quauhtemellan "land of the eagle" or Uhatzmalha "mountain where water gushes." Related: Guatemalan.

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cayuse (n.)

"horse, Indian pony of the northern Rockies," 1841, American English, said to be a Chinook (native Pacific Northwest) word; also the name of an Indian group and language (1825); of unknown origin.

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chili (n.)

also chilli, "pod or fruit of a type of American pepper, used as a condiment," 1660s, from Nahuatl (Aztecan) chilli, native name for the peppers. Not named for the South American country. As short for chile con carne and similar dishes, attested by 1846.

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nativism (n.)

"prejudice in favor of a country's natives, promotion and protection of their interests against those of immigrants," 1845, first in reference to the U.S. anti-immigrant movement that grew into the Native American Party, from native (adj.) + -ism. Later used in other contexts. Related: Nativist; nativistic.

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go south (v.)

"vanish, abscond," 1920s, American English, probably from mid-19c. notion of disappearing south to Mexico or Texas to escape pursuit or responsibility, reinforced by Native American belief (attested in colonial writing mid-18c.) that the soul journeys south after death.

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