Etymology
Advertisement
interruption (n.)

late 14c., "a break of continuity," from Latin interruptionem (nominative interruptio) "a breaking off, interruption, interval," noun of action from past participle stem of interrumpere "to break apart, break off" (see interrupt (v.)). Meaning "a breaking in upon some action" is from c. 1400; that of "a pause, a temporary cessation" is early 15c.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
high-toned (adj.)

1779 of musical pitch; 1807 of persons, "having high moral principles; dignified," from high (adv.) + tone (v.).

Related entries & more 
didgeridoo (n.)

"hollow, tubular musical instrument of Australian aborigines," 1924, Australian, of imitative origin.

Related entries & more 
intermit (v.)

1540s, "to interrupt" (obsolete); 1570s as "to discontinue for a time, suspend" (trans.) and "cease for a time" (intrans.), from Latin intermittere "to leave off, leave an interval, omit, suspend, interrupt, neglect," from inter "between" (see inter-) + mittere "to send" (see mission). Related: Intermitted; intermitting.

Related entries & more 
diatessaron (n.)

late 14c. as a term in music meaning "interval of a fourth;" 1803 in reference to harmonizings of the four gospels, especially that of Tatian (late 2c.), via Old French and Latin from Greek dia tessaron, from dia "composed of" (literally "through;" see dia-) + tessaron "four," related to tessares "the numeral four" (from PIE root *kwetwer- "four").

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
tacet 

musical instruction, 1724, from Latin tacet "is silent," third person singular present indicative of tacere (see tacit).

Related entries & more 
Guidonian (adj.)

1721, in reference to the system of musical notation devised by Guido d'Arezzo, who lived early 11c.

Related entries & more 
synthesizer (v.)

1869, agent noun from synthesize. As a type of instrument for generating musical or vocal sounds from 1909; the electronic version is from 1950s.

Related entries & more 
mi 

symbol-word for the third tone in a musical scale, 1520s; see gamut.

Related entries & more 
telephony (n.)

1835, "a system of signaling by musical sounds;" from 1876 as "the art of working a telephone;" see telephone (n.) + -y (4). Related: Telephonist.

Related entries & more 

Page 5