Etymology
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tabla (n.)
pair of drums used in northern Indian music, 1865, from Hindi, from Arabic tabl "a drum played with the hand."
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treble (n.)
"highest part in music, soprano," mid-14c., from Anglo-French treble, Old French treble "a third part," noun use of adjective (see treble (adj.)). In early contrapuntal music, the chief melody was in the tenor, and the treble was the "third" part above it (after the alto).
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rock and roll (n.)
also rock 'n' roll, 1954 in reference to a specific style of popular music, from rock (v.2) + roll (v.). The verbal phrase had been an African-American vernacular euphemism for "sexual intercourse," used in popular dance music lyrics and song titles at least since the 1930s.
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accompanist (n.)
"performer who takes the accompanying part in music," 1779, from accompany + -ist. Fowler prefers accompanyist.
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bluegrass (n.)
also blue-grass, music style, 1958, in reference to the Blue Grass Boys, country music band 1940s-'50s, from the "blue" grass (Poa pratensis) characteristic of Kentucky. The grass so called from 1751; Kentucky has been the Bluegrass State at least since 1872; see blue (adj.1) + grass.
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coliseum (n.)

"music hall," c. 1710, Modern Latin variant of Latin colosseum, the name of the amphitheater of Vespasian at Rome (see Colosseum).

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accompaniment (n.)
1744 in music (1731 as a term in heraldry), from French accompagnement (13c.), from accompagner (see accompany).
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jazzy (adj.)
"resembling jazz music, spirited, lively, exciting," 1918, from jazz (n.) + -y (2). Related: Jazzily; jazziness.
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cadenza (n.)
"ornamental passage near the close of a song or solo," 1780, from Italian cadenza "conclusion of a movement in music" (see cadence (n.)).
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instrumentation (n.)
"composition and arrangement of music for instruments," 1836, from French instrumentation, from instrument "musical instrument" (see instrument (n.)); also see -ation.
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