Etymology
Advertisement
multinational (adj.)

also multi-national, by 1921, "comprising or pertaining to many nations," from multi- + national. Originally with reference to states; later (by 1960) to corporations and organizations. As a noun, short for multinational corporation (itself attested by 1956), one having branches, offices, etc. in many countries, it is attested by 1971.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
racialism (n.)
1882, "tribalism;" 1890, "political system advocating superiority and exclusive rights based on race," from racial + -ism. Also see racist.
Related entries & more 
resettlement (n.)

"act of resettling; a fresh settlement," in any sense, 1630s, from resettle + -ment. In a South African racial context from 1954.

Related entries & more 
Aryanism (n.)
1858, "characteristic Aryan principles," from Aryan + -ism. As a belief in cultural or racial superiority of Aryans, from 1905.
Related entries & more 
multisyllable (n.)

"a word of many syllables," by 1818 as a dictionary word, from multi- "many" + syllable. As an adjective, "consisting of or containing many syllables," by 1892.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
multiversant (adj.)

"turning into many shapes, protean," 1828, from multi- "many" + present participle of Latin versare, literally "to turn often" (see versant).

Related entries & more 
multivalent (adj.)

1869, originally in chemistry, "having more than one degree of valency," from multi- "many" + -valent (see valence in the chemistry sense). Related Multivalence.

Related entries & more 
poly- 

word-forming element meaning "many, much, multi-, one or more," from Greek polys "much" (plural polloi), from PIE root *pele- (1) "to fill," with derivatives referring to multitudinousness or abundance. Equivalent to Latin multi-, it is properly used in compounds only with words of Greek origin. In chemical names, usually indicating a compound with a large number of atoms or molecules of the same kind (such as polymer).

Related entries & more 
multiformity (n.)

"diversity of forms; variety of shapes or appearances in one thing," 1580s, from Late Latin multiformitas, from Latin multiformis "many-shaped; manifold; various, diverse," see multi- + form (n.).

Related entries & more 
racism (n.)

by 1928, in common use from 1935, originally in a European context, "racial supremacy as a doctrine, the theory that human characteristics and abilities are determined by race;" see racist, and compare the various senses in race (n.2) and racialism. Applied to American social systems from late 1930s.

This meaning of Nationalism in no sense implies any consent to the doctrine of Racism, which holds that unity of racial origin is the main principle of unity for civil society and that the members of each ethnical branch should properly aim at grouping themselves together into so many national States. Although it is desirable that strongly-felt national aspirations, which often depend on community of race, should be satisfied, as far as this may be compatible with justice, Racism or the Principle of Racial Self determination, as it has been called in recent years is a materialistic illusion contrary to natural law and destructive of civilisation. [James Strachey Barnes, "The Universal Aspects of Fascism," London, 1928]
Related entries & more 

Page 5