Etymology
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foot-sore (adj.)

also footsore, "having sore or tender feet, as from much walking," 1719, from foot (n.) + sore (adj.).

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do-it-yourself (adj.)

as a modifier, attested by 1941. The expression is much older (1610s). Related: Do-it-yourselfer.

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hundredfold (n.)
c. 1200, "a hundred times as much," from hundred + -fold. Similar formation in German hundertfalt. Old English had hundfeald.
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pretty (adv.)

"to a considerable extent," expressing a degree less than very, 1560s, from pretty (adj.). Pretty much "in a considerable degree" is by 1660s.

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*mel- (2)

Proto-Indo-European root meaning "strong, great." It forms all or part of: ameliorate; amelioration; meliorate; melioration; meliorism; multi-; multiform; multiple; multiply; multitude. It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Greek mala "very, very much;" Latin multus "much, many," melior "better."  

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highly (adv.)
Old English healice "nobly, gloriously, honorably;" see high (adj.) + -ly (1). Meaning "very, very much, fully" is mid-14c.
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polygenous (adj.)

"composed of many kinds or sorts, of many kinds or families," 1797; see poly- "much, many" + genus.

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mouthful (n.)

early 15c., "as much as a mouth can hold," from mouth (n.) + -ful. Meaning "a lot to say" is from 1748.

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fantasise (v.)
artificial British English spelling of fantasize, not much attested before 1970s. For suffix, see -ize. Related: Fantasised; fantasising.
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Middlesex 

literally "(land of the) Middle Saxons" (those between Essex and Wessex); originally a much larger region. See middle (adj.) + Saxon.

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