Etymology
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breeze (v.)
1680s, "blow gently," from breeze (n.). Meaning "move briskly" is from 1904. Related: Breezed; breezing.
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dart (v.)

late 14c., darten, "to pierce with a dart" (a sense now obsolete), from dart (n.). Sense of "throw with a sudden thrust" is from 1570s. Intransitive meaning "to move swiftly" is from 1610s; that of "spring or start suddenly and run or move quickly" (like a dart) is from 1610s. Related: Darted; darter; darting.

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jitter (v.)
"to move agitatedly," 1931, American English, of unknown origin; see jitters. Related: Jittered; jittering.
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mobility (n.)

early 15c., "capacity for motion, ability to move or be moved, property of being easily movable," from Old French mobilité "changeableness, inconsistency, fickleness" and directly from Latin mobilitatem (nominative mobilitas) "activity, speed," figuratively "changeableness, fickleness, inconstancy," from mobilis "movable, easy to move" (see mobile (adj.)). Socio-economics sense of "possibility of movement between different social levels" is from 1900 in sociology writing.

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pry (v.2)

"raise or move by force," 1823, from a noun meaning "large lever used to raise or move heavy things, crowbar;" an alteration of prize (as though it were a plural) in its obsolete sense of "lever" (c. 1300), from Old French prise "a taking hold, grasp" (see prize (n.2)).

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affecting (adj.)
"having power to move or excite the feelings," 1720, present-participle adjective from affect (v.1).
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zip (v.1)
"move rapidly," 1852, of echoic origin. Meaning "close with a zipper" is from 1932. Related: Zipped; zipping.
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balky (adj.)
"apt to stop abruptly and refuse to move," 1847, from balk (n.) + -y (2). Related: Balkily; balkiness.
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back (v.)
mid-15c., "to keep something back, hinder," from back (adv.). Meaning "cause to move back" is from 1781. Intransitive sense "move or go back" is from late 15c. Meaning "furnish with a back or backing" is from 1728, from back (n.). Meaning "to support" (as by a bet) is attested from 1540s. Related: Backed; backing.
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skive (v.2)
"evade duty," usually with off, 1919, probably from earlier sense "move lightly and quickly, dart" (1854), of unknown origin. Related: Skived; skiving.
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