Etymology
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aerodynamic (adj.)
also aero-dynamic, "pertaining to the forces of air in motion," 1847; see aero- + dynamic (adj.). Compare German aerodynamische (1835), French aérodynamique.
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low-budget (adj.)
1939, originally of motion pictures, "made with little expense;" from low (adj.) + budget (n.). Usually with a suggestion of low quality as a result.
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palinal (adj.)

"directed or moved backward, characterized by or involving backward motion," 1888, from Greek palin "back, again" (see palindrome) + -al (1).

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excite (v.)

mid-14c., exciten, "to move, stir up, instigate," from Old French esciter (12c.) or directly from Latin excitare "rouse, call out, summon forth, produce," frequentative of exciere "call forth, instigate," from ex "out" (see ex-) + ciere "set in motion, call" (from PIE root *keie- "to set in motion"). Of feelings, "to stir up, rouse," from late 14c. Of bodily organs or tissues, from 1831. Sense of "rouse the emotions of, emotionally agitate" is attested from 1821.

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seismometer (n.)

"instrument for measuring the intensity and motion of earthquakes," 1841, from seismo- + -meter. Originally different from a seismograph but now practically the same thing. Related: Seismometric; seismometry.

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scythe (v.)

1570s, "use a scythe;" 1590s "to mow;" from scythe (n.). By 1897 as "move with the sweeping motion of one using a scythe." Related: Scythed; scything.

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*keie- 

also keiə-, Proto-Indo-European root meaning "to set in motion."

It might form all or part of: behest; cinema; cinematography; citation; cite; excite; hest; hight; hyperkinetic; incite; kinase; kinematics; kinesics; kinesiology; kinesis; kinesthesia; kinesthetic; kinetic; kineto-; kino-; oscitant; recital; recitation; recite; resuscitate; solicit; solicitous; suscitate; telekinesis.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Sanskrit cyavate "stirs himself, goes;" Greek kinein "to move, set in motion; change, stir up," kinymai "move myself;" Latin ciere (past participle citus, frequentative citare) "to set in motion, summon;" Gothic haitan "call, be called;" Old English hatan "command, call."  

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flywheel (n.)
also fly-wheel, "heavy-rimmed revolving wheel to regulate motion," 1784, from fly (n.) "speed-regulating device" (1590s, from fly (v.1)) + wheel (n.).
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rapidity (n.)

"celerity of motion or action," 1650s, from French rapidité and directly from Latin rapiditatem (nominative rapiditas) "swiftness, rapidity, velocity," from rapidus "hasty, swift, rapid" (see rapid).

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ramjet (n.)

type of jet engine, 1942, from ram (v.) + jet (n.). So called because it uses the engine's forward motion as the sole means to compress air.

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