Etymology
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motherfucker (n.)

also mother-fucker, by 1956, usually simply an intensive of fucker. It is implied in clipped form mother (with the context made clear) by 1928; motherfucking is by 1906. Abbreviation m.f. (for motherfucking) is in a rendition of soldier talk in Pound's "Pisan Cantos" (1948).

A short time after he returned, appellant drew a six-shooter and told deceased, in a loud tone of voice, that he would shoot his God damn heart out, and called him a mother-fucking son of a bitch. He held his pistol on him a little while, and then put it in his pocket, and stood there some time. [account of Puryear vs. State of Texas in Court of Criminal Appeals of Texas, "The Southwestern Reporter," vol. 98, 1907, p. 258. The homicide at the center of the case took place in Austin, Texas, March 3, 1906]
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mottled (adj.)

"dappled, marked with spots or patches of color of unequal intensity passing insensibly into one another," 1670s, past-participle adjective from see mottle (v.).

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motorcycle (n.)

"a large bicycle propelled by a small motor," 1895, a hybrid from motor + -cycle, from bicycle. Motocycle also was used late 19c.

The horse follows the crooks of a country road, but then the training of the "motorcycle" (horrid name) will inevitably straighten out the crooks in the country road, and afford long ranges of straight tracks. [Payson Burleigh, "The Age of Steel," Oct. 12, 1895]

Related: Motorcyclist.

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motile (adj.)

"capable of spontaneous movement," 1831, back-formation from motility.

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Mother Hubbard 

in reference to a kind of loose, full gown worn by women, 1878, from Old Mother Hubbard, nursery rhyme, which was printed 1805, written by Sarah Catherine Martin (1768-1826) but based on earlier material of unknown origin. The name is attested from 1591.

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mothball (v.)

1902 in a literal sense (to store away with mothballs), from mothball (n.); figurative sense "to lay up or disuse for a long time" is from 1901, popularized c. 1946 in U.S. in reference to warships at the end of World War II.

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motor-boat (n.)

also motorboat, "motor-driven boat," 1875, from motor (n.) + boat (n.).

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mottle (v.)

"to mark or cover with spots or blotches of different colors or shades," 1670s; see mottle (n.). Related: Mottled; mottling.

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mother (n.2)

"a thick substance concreting in liquors; the lees or scum concreted" [Johnson], 1530s, probably from Middle Dutch modder "filth, dregs," from PIE *meu- (see mud).

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motel (n.)

1925, coined from motor- + hotel. Originally a hotel for automobile travelers.

The Milestone Interstate Corporation ... proposes to build and operate a chain of motor hotels between San Diego and Seattle, the hotels to have the name 'Motel.' ["Hotel Monthly," March 1925]
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