Etymology
Advertisement
half-shirt (n.)
1660s, "shirt front," from half + shirt. In modern use, "shirt cropped high at the waist," 2000.
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
antedate (v.)
1580s, "to date before the true time," earlier as noun meaning "a backdating, false early date attached to a document or event" (1570s); from Latin ante "before" (from PIE root *ant- "front, forehead," with derivatives meaning "in front of, before") + date (v.1). Meaning "be of older date than" is from 1660s. Related: Antedated; antedating.
Related entries & more 
antecede (v.)
"come before in time, place, or order," early 15c. (implied in anteceding), from Latin antecedere "go before," from ante "before" (from PIE root *ant- "front, forehead," with derivatives meaning "in front of, before") + cedere "to yield" (from PIE root *ked- "to go, yield"). Related: Anteceded; anteceding.
Related entries & more 
cow-catcher (n.)

"strong frame in front of a locomotive for removing obstructions such as stray cattle," 1838, from cow (n.) + catcher.

Related entries & more 
farther (adj.)
late 14c., "front;" variant of further (adj.). From 1510s as "additional;" 1560s as "more remote."
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
affront (v.)
early 14c., "offend by open disrespect," a figurative use, from Old French afronter "to face, confront; to slap in the face" (13c., Modern French affronter), from Late Latin affrontare "to strike against," from Latin ad frontem "to the face," from ad "to" (see ad-) + frons (genitive frontis) "forehead, front" (see front (n.)). Related: Affronted; affronting.
Related entries & more 
footlights (n.)
"row of lights placed in front of a stage" (formerly called floats), 1836, from foot (n.) of the stage + light (n.).
Related entries & more 
ante-partum (adj.)

also antepartum, "occurring or existing before birth," 1908, from Latin phrase ante partum "before birth," from ante "before" (from PIE root *ant- "front, forehead," with derivatives meaning "in front of, before") + accusative of partus "a bearing, a bringing forth," from partus, past participle of parire "to bring forth" (from PIE root *pere- (1) "to produce, procure").

Related entries & more 
nationalist (n.)

"one devoted to his nation," 1715, from national (adj.) in a now-otherwise-obsolete sense of "patriotic, characterized by attachment or devotion to one's own race or country or its institutions" (1711) + -ist. In 19c. Britain often particularly "one who advocates independence for a nation" (especially Ireland). Also used in theology for "one who holds to the divine election of entire nations," as distinguished from that of particular individuals (1836). Related: Nationalistic; nationalistically.

Related entries & more 
antler (n.)
late 14c., "first tine or branch of the horns of a deer," from Anglo-French auntiler, Old French antoillier (14c., Modern French andouiller) "antler," which is perhaps from Gallo-Roman cornu *antoculare "horn in front of the eyes," from Latin ante "before" (from PIE root *ant- "front, forehead," with derivatives meaning "in front of, before") + ocularis "of the eyes" (from Latin oculus "an eye," from PIE root *okw- "to see").

This etymology is doubted by some because no similar word exists in any other Romance language, but compare German Augensprossen "antlers," literally "eye-sprouts," for a similar formation. Later used of any branch of the horns. Related: Antlered (1813).
Related entries & more 

Page 5