Etymology
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selenocentric (adj.)

"having the moon as the center," 1827; from seleno- combining form meaning "moon, of the moon," from Greek selēnē "moon" (see Selene) + -centric.

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luna (n.)
late 14c. "the moon," especially as personified in a Roman goddess answering to Greek Selene; also an alchemical name for "silver;" from Latin luna "moon, goddess of the moon," from PIE *leuksna- (source also of Old Church Slavonic luna "moon," Old Prussian lauxnos "stars," Middle Irish luan "light, moon"), suffixed form of root *leuk- "light, brightness." The luna moth (1841, American English) so called for the crescent-shaped eye-spots on its wings.
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Lunarian (n.)
1708, "moon-man, inhabitant of the moon;" see lunar + -ian. Also "expert on or student of lunar phenomena" (1817).
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lunation (n.)
"time from one new moon to the next," late 14c., from Medieval Latin lunationem, from Latin luna "moon" (see luna).
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selenite (n.)

type of precious stone, late 14c., from Latin selenites, from Greek selēnitēs "moonstone," literally "of the moon" (in lithos selēnitēs), from selēnē "moon" (see Selene). Said to be so called for its coloring or for its supposed waxing and waning with the moon.

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lunette (n.)

1570s, "semi-circular partial horseshoe," from French lunette (13c.), literally "little moon," diminutive of lune "moon," from Latin luna (see luna). Later applied to a wide range of objects and ornamentations resembling more or less a crescent moon.

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moonlight (v.)

"hold a second job, especially at night," 1957 (implied in the verbal noun moonlighting), from moonlighter "one who takes a second job after hours" (1954), from the notion of working by the light of the moon; see moonlight (n.). Earlier the verb had been used to mean "commit crimes at night" (1882), from moonlighter in reference to members of organized bands that carried on agrarian outrages in Ireland. And compare moonshine. Moonlighter in American English meant "one of a party who go about serenading on moonlit nights" (by 1897).

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selenotropic (adj.)

"turning toward the moon," 1883, from seleno-, combining form from Selene "moon," + -tropic, from Greek tropos "a turning," from trepein "to turn" (from PIE root *trep- "to turn"). Related: Selenotropism.

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hunter (n.)

"one who engages in the chase of game or other wild animals," mid-13c. (attested in place names from late 12c.), from hunt + -er (1). The Old English word was hunta, Middle English hunte. The hunter's moon (1710) is the next full moon after the harvest moon.

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Jericho 
Biblical city (Numbers xxii.1, etc.), perhaps ultimately from Hebrew yareakh "moon, month," and thus a reference to an ancient moon cult. As a figurative place of retirement (17c.), the reference is to II Samuel x.5.
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