Etymology
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savings (n.)

"money saved," 1737, plural of saving (n.), which see.

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Paypal (n.)

e-commerce money transfer business, formed 2000 by merger of earlier firms.

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schatzi (n.)

"German girlfriend," 1956, from U.S. Army jargon, from German Schatzi, diminutive of Schatz, a term of endearment for a woman, literally "treasure," from Proto-Germanic *skatta- (source also of Dutch schat "treasure," Gothic skatts "piece of money, money"), originally "cattle," which is of uncertain origin.

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lolly (n.)

short for lollipop, 1854. Also, in mid-20c. British slang, "money."

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investor (n.)

1580s, "one who clothes;" 1862, "one who invests money," agent noun from invest.

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take (n.)

1650s, "that which is taken," from take (v.). Sense of "money taken in" by a single performance, etc., is from 1931. Movie-making sense is recorded from 1927. Criminal sense of "money acquired by theft" is from 1888. The verb sense of "to cheat, defraud" is from 1920. On the take "amenable to bribery" is from 1930.

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changer (n.)

early 14c., "one who alters the form of anything," agent noun from change (v.), or else from Old French changeour "money-changer, barterer," from changier. The meaning "money-changer" in English is from mid-14c. The meaning "mechanism for automatically changing records on a record-player" is from 1930.

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fine (n.)

c. 1200, "termination, end; end of life," from Old French fin "end, limit, boundary; death; fee, payment, finance, money" (10c.), from Latin finis "end" (see finish (v.)), in Medieval Latin also "payment in settlement, fine or tax."

Modern meaning "exaction of money payment for an offense or dereliction" is via sense of "sum of money paid for exemption from punishment or to compensate for injury" (mid-14c., from the same sense in Anglo-French, late 13c.) and from phrases such as to make fine "make one's peace, settle a matter" (c. 1300). Meaning "sum of money imposed as penalty for some offense" is first recorded 1520s.

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boodle (n.)

1833, "crowd;" 1858, "phony money," especially "graft money," actual or potential (1883), both American English slang, either or both based on bundle (n.), or from Dutch boedel "property, riches," which is from Proto-Germanic *bothla, from PIE root *bheue- "to be, exist, grow."

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viaticum (n.)

1560s, from Latin viaticum "traveling money; provision for a journey," noun use of neuter of adjective viaticus, from via "way" (see via). In Late Latin also "money to pay the expenses of one studying abroad," and in Church Latin, "the eucharist given to a dying person."

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