Etymology
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operation (n.)

late 14c., "action, performance, work," also "the performance of some science or art," from Old French operacion "operation, working, proceedings," from Latin operationem (nominative operatio) "a working, operation," noun of action from past-participle stem of operari "to work, labor" (in Late Latin "to have effect, be active, cause"), from opera "work, effort," related to opus (genitive operis) "a work" (from PIE root *op- "to work, produce in abundance").

The surgical sense of "act or series of acts performed upon a patient's body," usually with instruments, is first attested 1590s. The military sense of "act of carrying out a preconcerted series of movements" is by 1749.

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revue (n.)

1872, "a show presenting a review of current events," from French revue, literally "survey," noun use of fem. past participle of revoir "to see again" (see review (n.)). By 1890s it was extended to any elaborate musical show consisting of a series of unrelated scenes.

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ordinate (adj.)

late 14c., "regular, normal," of behavior, thoughts, etc., "properly directed, proper," from Latin ordinatus, past participle of ordinare "arrange, set in order," from ordo (genitive ordinis) "row, rank, series, arrangement" (see order (n.)). Related: Ordinately.

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podcast 

"episodic series of spoken-word digital audio files that can be downloaded to a personal device and listened to at leisure," 2004, noun and verb, from pod-, from iPod, brand of portable media player, + second element abstracted from broadcast. Related: Podcasting.

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coordinate (adj.)

1640s, "of the same order, belonging to the same rank or degree," from Medieval Latin coordinatus, past participle of coordinare "to set in order, arrange," from assimilated form of com "with, together" (see com-) + ordinatio "arrangement," from ordo "row, rank, series, arrangement" (see order (n.)). Meaning "involving coordination" is from 1769. Related: Coordinance.

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sutra (n.)
in Buddhism, "series of aphorisms" concerning ceremonies, rites, and conduct, 1801, from Sanskrit sutram "rule," literally "string, thread" (as a measure of straightness), from sivyati "sew," from PIE root *syu- "to bind, sew." Applied also to rules of grammar, law, philosophy, etc., along with their commentaries.
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Gondwana 

name of a region in north central India, from Sanskrit gondavana, from vana "forest" + Gonda, Sanskrit name of a Dravidian people, said to mean literally "fleshy navel, outie belly-button."

The name was extended by geologists to a series of sedimentary rocks found there (1873), then to identical rocks in other places. Because the fossils found in this series were used by geologists to reconstruct the map of the supercontinent which broke up into the modern southern continents of the globe about 180 million years ago, this was called Gondwanaland (1896), from German, where it was coined by German geologist Eduard Suess in 1885.

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colonnade (n.)

in architecture, "a series of columns placed at certain intervals," 1718, from French colonnade, from Italian colonnato, from colonna "column," from Latin columna "pillar," collateral form of columen "top, summit," from PIE root *kel- (2) "to be prominent; hill." Also see -ade. Related: Colonnaded.

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extrapolation (n.)

"an approximate calculation made by inferring unknown values from trends in the known data," 1867, noun of action from extrapolate by analogy of interpolation. The original sense was "an inserting of intermediate terms in a mathematical series." The transferred sense of "drawing of a conclusion about the future based on present tendencies" is from 1889.

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cline (n.)

1938, in biology, "a graded series of differences within a species," a back-formation from incline or from a Latinized form of Greek klinein "to slope, to lean" (from PIE root *klei- "to lean"). Earlier, but now obsolete, was a verb cline, from Middle English clinen "to bend, bow," from Old French cliner, from Latin clinare.

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