Etymology
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paramilitary (adj.)

"in reference to organizations or forces analogous or auxiliary to that of military units but not professional," 1935, from para- (1) + military. In early use often in reference to the S.A. and S.S. of Nazi Germany.

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militia (n.)

1580s, "system of military discipline," from Latin militia "military service, warfare," from miles "soldier" (see military (adj.)). The sense of "citizen army" (as distinct from professional soldiers) is first recorded 1690s, perhaps from a sense in French cognate milice. Historically, the Anglo-Saxon forces that resisted the Vikings were militias, raised by counties. In U.S. history, by 1777 as "the whole body of men declared by law amenable to military service, without enlistment, whether armed and drilled or not" [Century Dictionary]. In early 19c. they were under control of the states, enrolled and drilled according to military law but not as regular soldiers, and called out periodically for drill and exercise and in emergency for actual service.

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anima mundi (n.)

"spiritual essence, distinct from matter and supposed in the philosophy of Pythagoras and Plato to be diffused throughout the universe, organizing and acting through the whole of it," 1670s, Medieval Latin, literally "soul of the world;" used by Abelard to render Greek psychē tou kosmou. From fem. of Latin animus "the rational soul; life; the mental powers, intelligence" (see animus) + genitive of mundus "universe, world" (see mundane).

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mansplain (v.)

"to explain, as a man to a woman, in a way that she feels insults or ignores her intelligence and experience in the matter," by 2008, from man (n.) + second element from explain (v.). The form 'splain, as a clip of explain, had been used at least since the 1960s as a colloquialism. Related: Mansplained; mansplaining.

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dink (n.2)

derogatory for "Vietnamese," 1969, U.S. military slang, of uncertain origin.

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commandeer (v.)

1881, "to seize or force into military service," from Dutch (especially Afrikaans) kommandeeren "to command" (for military service), from French commander "to order" (see command (v.)). General sense "take arbitrary possession of" is from 1900. Related: Commandeered; commandeering.

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fubar (adj.)

by 1944, acronym from fucked up beyond all recognition. Said to be military slang originally.

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M.P. 

1917, abbreviation of military police, which is recorded from 1827. By 1809 as an abbreviation of Member of Parliament.

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ack-ack 

1939, representing A.A., the military abbreviation for anti-aircraft (see ack).

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draftee (n.)

"person conscripted for military purpose," 1864, American English, from draft + -ee.

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