Etymology
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unforeseen (adj.)
late 14c., from un- (1) "not" + past participle of foresee. Similar formation in Middle Dutch onvoresien, Dutch onvoorzien, Middle High German unvorsen.
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wl- 
an initial sound cluster in words in Old English and early Middle English; among the Old English words were wlanc "stately, splendid;" wlætung "nausea;" wlenc "pride, arrogance" (Middle English wlonk); wlite "brightness, beauty, splendor;" wlitig" radiant, physically beautiful (Middle English wliti).
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nibble (v.)

"to bite gently; eat by gnawing off small bits," c. 1500, not found in Middle English; perhaps from Low German nibbeln "to nibble, gnaw," related to Middle Low German nibbelen, Middle Dutch knibbelen "to gnaw," source of Dutch knibbelen "to cavail, squabble." Related: Nibbled; nibbling.

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grime (n.)

1580s, of uncertain origin, probably alteration of Middle English grim "dirt, filth" (early 14c.), from Middle Low German greme "dirt" or another Low German source, from Proto-Germanic *grim- "to smear" (source also of Flemish grijm, Middle Dutch grime "soot, mask"), from PIE root *ghrei- "to rub." The verb was Middle English grymen (mid-15c.) but largely was replaced early 16c. by begrime.

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dell (n.1)
Old English dell "dell, hollow, dale" (perhaps lost and then borrowed in Middle English from cognate Middle Dutch/Middle Low German delle), from Proto-Germanic *daljo (source also of German Delle "dent, depression," Gothic ib-dalja "slope of a mountain"); related to dale (q.v.).
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minge (n.)

"female pudendum," 1903, of unknown origin. Watkins suggests it is from Romany (Gypsy) mindž "vagina," which is possibly from Armenian mēǰ "middle," from PIE root *medhyo- "middle."

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unrest (n.)
mid-14c., from un- (1) "not" + rest (n.). Similar formation in West Frisian onrest, Middle Low German unreste, German unrast, Middle Dutch onruste.
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unfree (adj.)
c. 1300, from un- (1) "not" + free (adj.). Similar formation in Middle Dutch onvri, Old High German unfri, German unfrei, Middle Danish ufri.
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mediate (v.)

1540s, "divide in two equal parts" (a sense now obsolete), from Latin mediatus, past participle of mediare "to halve," later, "be in the middle," from Latin medius "middle" (from PIE root *medhyo- "middle"); from 1640s as "occupy a middle place or position." Meaning "act as a mediator, intervene for the purpose of reconciliation" is from 1610s; that of "settle by mediation, harmonize, reconcile" is from 1560s, perhaps back-formations from mediation or mediator. Related: Mediated; mediates; mediating.

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slobber (v.)
c. 1400, probably of imitative origin; compare Frisian slobberje "to slurp," Middle Low German slubberen "slurp," Middle Dutch overslubberen "wade through a ditch." Related: Slobbered; slobbering. As noun from c. 1400 as "mud, slime," 1755 as "saliva." Congreve has slabber (v.), from Middle Dutch slabberen.
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