Etymology
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ventilation (n.)
"process of replacing foul air in an enclosed place with fresh, pure air," 1660s, from Latin ventilationem (nominative ventilatio) "an exposing to the air," noun of action from past participle stem of ventilare (see ventilate).
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aerodynamics (n.)
"science of the motion of air or other gases," 1837, from aero- "air" + dynamics.
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tune (n.)
early 14c., "a musical sound," unexplained variant of tone (n.). From late 14c. as "a well-rounded succession of musical notes, an air, melody." Meaning "state of being in proper pitch" is from mid-15c.
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aerophyte (n.)
"plant which lives exclusively on air," 1838, perhaps via French aerophyte, from aero- "air" + -phyte "plant."
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aero- 

word-forming element meaning "air, atmosphere; gases," in 20c. use with reference to aircraft or aviation, from Greek aēr (genitive aeros) "air, lower atmosphere" (see air (n.1)).

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aloft (adv.)
"on high, in the air," c. 1200, from a Scandinavian source such as Old Norse a lopt "up above," literally "up in the air," from a "in, on" (see on) + lopt "sky, air, atmosphere; loft, upper room," from the general Germanic word for "air" (cognate with Gothic luftus, Old High German luft, Old English lyft "air;" see loft (n.)). Scandinavian -pt- pronounced like -ft-. The Old English equivalent was on þa lyft.
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airing (n.)
"action of exposing to air," c. 1600, verbal noun from air (v.). Meaning "display, public exposure" is from 1870.
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aeration (n.)

1570s, "act of exposing to air," from French aération, noun of action from aérer (v.), from Latin aer "the air, atmosphere" (see air (n.1)). In some cases, from aerate. In early scientific writing, aer/aër was used for specific kinds of air, a sense later given to gas (n.1).

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R.A.F. 
also RAF, initialism (acronym) for Royal Air Force, founded 1918 by consolidation of Royal Flying Corps and Royal Naval Air Service.
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malaria (n.)

1740, "unwholesome air, air contaminated with the poison producing intermittent and remittent fever," from Italian mal'aria, from mala aria, literally "bad air," from mala "bad" (fem. of malo, from Latin malus; see mal-) + aria "air" (see air (n.1)). Probably first used by Italian physician Francisco Torti (1658-1741). By 1866 it had come to be used of the disease itself (earlier malaria fever, by 1814). The disease, now known to be mosquito-borne, once was thought to be caused by foul air in marshy districts. Replaced native ague.

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