Etymology
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imagine (v.)

mid-14c., "to form a mental image of," from Old French imaginer "sculpt, carve, paint; decorate, embellish" (13c.), from Latin imaginari "to form a mental picture, picture to oneself, imagine" (also, in Late Latin imaginare "to form an image of, represent"), from imago "an image, a likeness," from stem of imitari "to copy, imitate" (from PIE root *aim- "to copy"). Sense of "suppose, assume" is first recorded late 14c. Related: Imagined; imagining.

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psychopathology (n.)

1847, "the science of mental disorders," from psycho- + pathology, on model of German psychopathologie. By 1947 as "a mentally deranged state or condition."

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brooding (n.)
"action of incubating," c. 1400, verbal noun from brood (v.). Figuratively (of weather, etc.) from 1805; of mental fixations by 1873. Related: Broodingly.
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irritable (adj.)
1660s, "susceptible to mental irritation," from French irritable and directly from Latin irritabilis "easily excited," from irritare "excite, provoke" (see irritate). Meaning "responding quickly to a stimulus" is from 1791. Related: Irritably.
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noesis (n.)

"intellect, intelligence," 1820, from Greek noēsis "intelligence, thought," from noein "to see, perceive, have mental perception," from noos "mind, thought" which is of uncertain origin.

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predisposition (n.)

"state of having a previous tendency or inclination in a particular direction, mental or physical susceptibility," 1620s, from pre- + disposition. Related: Predispositional.

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inclinable (adj.)
"amenable, disposed, having a mental bent in a certain direction," mid-15c., from Old French enclinable and directly from Latin inclinabilis, from inclinare (see incline (v.)).
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refreshing (adj.)

"tending or serving to refresh, invigorating," 1570s, present-participle adjective from refresh (v.). Mental or spiritual sense is attested from 1690s. Related: Refreshingly.

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conceptual (adj.)

"pertaining to mental conception," 1820 (there is an isolated use from 1662), from Medieval Latin conceptualis, from Latin conceptus "a collecting, gathering, conceiving," past participle of concipere "to take in" (see conceive). Perhaps it emerged to go with the distinctly mental sense of conception, as it seems rarely, if ever, to have been used in the physical sense. Conceptional "pertaining to or having the nature of (physical) conception" is from 1832.

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psychosis (n.)

1847, "mental affection or derangement," Modern Latin, from Greek psykhē "mind, life, soul" (see psyche) + -osis "abnormal condition." Greek psykhosis meant "a giving of life; animation; principle of life."

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