Etymology
Advertisement
fondue (n.)

1781 as a French word in English; naturalized from c. 1800, from French cooking term fondue "a cheese-pudding," literally "melted" (15c.), noun use of fem. of fondu, past-participle adjective from fondre "to melt," from Latin fundere (past participle fusus) "to melt, cast, pour out" (from nasalized form of PIE root *gheu- "to pour").

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
re-fuse (v.)

"to melt again," 1875, from re- "again" + fuse (v.). Related: Re-fused; re-fusing; re-fusion (1811).

Related entries & more 
font (n.2)

"complete set of characters of a particular face and size of printing type," 1680s (also fount); earlier "a casting" (1570s); from French fonte "a casting," noun use of fem. past participle of fondre "to melt," from Latin fundere (past participle fusus) "to melt, cast, pour out" (from nasalized form of PIE root *gheu- "to pour"). So called because all the letters in a given set were cast at the same time.

Related entries & more 
molten (adj.)

"melted, in a state of solution," c. 1300, from archaic strong past participle of Old English meltian, a class III strong verb (see melt (v.)).

Related entries & more 
foundry (n.)

c. 1600, "art of casting metal," from French fonderei, from fondre "to cast," from Latin fundere (past participle fusus) "to melt, cast, pour out," from nasalized form of PIE root *gheu- "to pour." Meaning "establishment for the founding of metallic articles" is from 1640s. Related: Foundryman.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
liquescent (adj.)

"having a tendency to become liquid," 1727, from Latin liquescentem (nominative liquescens), present participle of liquescere "to melt," from liquere "to be liquid" (see liquid (adj.)) Related: Liquescency (1650s).

Related entries & more 
downy (adj.)

"covered with down; resembling down," 1570s, from down (n.1) + -y (2). Related: Downiness.

Related entries & more 
melter (n.)

1530s, "one who melts," especially "the official who superintends the melting of gold and silver for coin in a mint," agent noun from melt (v.). By 1883 as "a furnace, pot, or crucible used for melting."

Related entries & more 
duvet (n.)

"quilt or comforter stuffed with down," 1758, from French duvet "down," earlier dumet, diminutive of dum "down."

Related entries & more 
viscous (adj.)

late 14c., from Anglo-French viscous and directly from Late Latin viscosus "sticky," from Latin viscum "anything sticky, birdlime made from mistletoe, mistletoe," probably from PIE root *weis- "to melt away, flow" (used of foul or malodorous fluids); see virus.

Related entries & more 

Page 5