Etymology
Advertisement
tendinitis (n.)
1900, from Medieval Latin tendinis, genitive of tendo (see tendon) + -itis "inflammation."
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
biblico- 
word-forming element meaning "biblical, biblical and," from combining form of Medieval Latin biblicus, from biblia (see Bible).
Related entries & more 
lachrymal (adj.)
also lachrimal, lacrymal, early 15c., from Medieval Latin lacrimalis "pertaining to tears," from Latin lacrima, lacryma "a tear" (see lachrymose). The corrupted spelling with -ch- began in Medieval Latin. Hence French larme, Spanish lagrima "a tear," French larmoyer "to shed tears."
Related entries & more 
imputable (adj.)
1620s, from Medieval Latin imputabilis, from Latin imputare "to charge, ascribe" (see impute). Related: Imputability.
Related entries & more 
placitory (adj.)

"of or pertaining to pleas or pleading in a court of law," 1640s, from Medieval Latin placitum.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
quittance (n.)

c. 1200, cwitance, quitaunce, "payment, compensation;" c. 1300, "a discharge from a debt or an obligation," from Old French quitance (Modern French quittance), from quiter "clear, establish one's innocence;" also transitive, "release, let go, relinquish, abandon" (12c.), from quite "free, clear, entire, at liberty; discharged; unmarried," from Medieval Latin quitus, quittus, from Latin quietus "free" (in Medieval Latin "free from war, debts, etc."), also "calm, resting" (from PIE root *kweie- "to rest, be quiet"). The Middle English word also is in part from Medieval Latin quittantia, a variant of quietantia.

Related entries & more 
mystery (n.2)

"handicraft, trade, art" (archaic), late 14c., misterie, from Medieval Latin misterium, alteration of Latin ministerium "service, occupation, office, ministry" (see ministry), influenced in form by Medieval Latin mysterium (see mystery (n.1)) and in sense by maistrie "mastery." Now perhaps only in mystery play, in reference to the medieval performances, if they often were, as is often said, staged by members of craft guilds. The two senses of mystery formed a common pun in (secular) Tudor theater.

Related entries & more 
Anglist (n.)
"student of English," from German Anglist, from Medieval Latin Angli (see Angle). Related: Anglistics.
Related entries & more 
cutaneous (adj.)

"pertaining to the skin," 1570s, from Medieval Latin cutaneus, from Latin cutis "the skin" (see cuticle).

Related entries & more 
indignance (n.)
1580s, from indignant + -ance or else from Medieval Latin indignantia. Indignancy is attested from 1778.
Related entries & more 

Page 5