Etymology
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restorer (n.)

early 15c., restorour, in medicine (Chauliac), "one who resets a dislocation," from Old French restoreor, agent noun from restorer (see restore (v.)).

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ethyl (n.)
1838, from German ethyl (Liebig, 1834), from ether + -yl. Ethyl alcohol, under other names, was widely used in medicine by 13c.
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obstetrics (n.)

"science of midwifery, the department of medicine which deals with the treatment and care of women during pregnancy and childbirth," 1819, from obstetric (adj.); also see -ics.

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absorbing (adj.)

1670s, "soaking up, swallowing," present-participle adjective in a figurative sense from absorb (v.). Originally in medicine. Figurative sense of "engrossing" is by 1826. Related: Absorbingly.

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posset (n.)

spiced drink of hot milk and wine or liquor, mid-15c., of unknown origin. Formerly much in favor as a luxury and as medicine. Posset-cup is from c. 1600.

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rupture (v.)

1739, in medicine, "to break, burst" (a vessel, etc.), from rupture (n.). The intransitive sense of "suffer a break" is by 1863. Related: Ruptured; rupturing. The old verb was rupt (Middle English rupten, in medicine, early 15c.), from Latin ruptus. Ruptured duck (1945) was U.S. GI's dismissive term (based on its design) for the discharge button they were awarded. Earlier it was used in a sense of "a damaged aircraft" (1930). Compare lame duck.

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dysfunction (n.)

"failure to function, abnormality or impairment of function," 1914, from dys- "bad, abnormal, difficult" + function (n.). Originally in anatomy and medicine; in sociology by 1949.

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restorative (n.)

mid-15c., "food or medicine which restores health or strength," from restorative (adj.), or from Medieval Latin restaurativum "a restorative," noun use of the neuter of restorativus.

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-plasia 
word-forming element in biology and medicine denoting "formation, growth, development," from Modern Latin -plasia, from Greek plasis "molding, formation," from plassein "to mold" (see plasma).
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socialize (v.)
1828, "to render social," from social (adj.). Meaning "to be sociable, to mingle" is recorded from 1895. Meaning "to make socialistic" is from 1846. Related: Socialized; socializing. The phrasing in socialized medicine is by 1912.
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