Etymology
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intestinal (adj.)
early 15c., from medical Latin intestinalis, from Latin intestinum "an intestine, gut" (see intestine).
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gyno- 
word-forming element especially in modern medical and botanical words equivalent to gyneco-.
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suppurative (adj.)
1540s, from medical Latin suppurativus, from suppurat-, stem of suppurare (see suppuration). As a noun from 1560s.
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cortico- 

used as a combining form of cortex (genitive corticis) in medical terms (see cortical).

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M.D. 

affixed to the name of a medical doctor, by 1723, an abbreviation of Latin Medicinæ Doctor "doctor of medicine."

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gigantism (n.)
medical condition causing abnormal increased size, 1854, from Latin gigant- "giant" (see gigantic) + -ism.
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pyuria (n.)

"presence of pus in the urine," 1787, from medical Latin (by 1760s), from pyo- + -uria (see urine).

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rhinitis (n.)

"inflammation of the nose," especially the mucous membrane, 1829, medical Latin, from rhino- "nose" + -itis "inflammation."

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varicella (n.)
"chicken-pox," medical Latin, 1764, irregular diminutive of variola (see variola). Related: Varicellous.
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hyperthermia (n.)
1878, medical Latin, from hyper- "over, exceedingly, to excess" + Greek therme "heat" (see thermal) + abstract noun ending -ia.
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