Etymology
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rascally (adj.)

"low, mean, unprincipled, characteristic of a rascal," 1590s, from rascal + -ly (1). The earlier adjective was simply rascal (early 15c.).

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Tehran 
also Teheran, Iranian capital, said to mean "flat, level, lower," but sometimes derived from Old Persian teh "warm" + ran "place."
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sayonara 

"farewell, good-bye," 1875, from Japanese, said to mean literally "if it is to be that way," from sayo "that way," + nara "if."

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Horus 
Egyptian hawk-headed god of dual relations, 1650s, from Latin Horus, from Greek Horos, from Egyptian Hor, said to mean literally "the high-flying one."
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tundra (n.)
an Arctic steppe, 1841, from Russian tundra, from Lappish (Finno-Ugric) tundar, said to mean "elevated wasteland, high-topped hill," or "a marshy plain."
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chop-house (n.)
1680s, "a mean house of entertainment, where provision ready dressed is sold" [Johnson], from chop (n.) in the "meat" sense + house (n.).
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advisable (adj.)
1640s, "prudent, expedient," from advise (v.) + -able (q.v.). It also can mean "open to advice" (1660s), but this is rare.
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credit-card (n.)
1952 in the modern sense; see credit (n.) + card (n.1). The phrase was used late 19c. to mean "traveler's check."
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retaliatory (adj.)

"pertaining to or of the nature of retaliation," 1783; see retaliate + -ory. Alternative retaliative is attested from 1819 but seems more to mean "vindictive, revengeful."

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drudge (n.)

late 15c., "one employed in mean, servile, or distasteful work, one who toils at uninteresting employments," from drudge (v.). 

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