Etymology
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realizable (adj.)

"that may be realized" in any sense, 1847; see realize + -able.

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bippy (n.)
by 1968, "buttocks, ass," U.S. slang, the kind of thing that once sounded naughty on "Laugh-In" (and briefly was popularized by that program). As it often was used with you bet your ... it may be nonsense chosen for alliteration, but there may be some whiff of biped in it.
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self-denial (n.)

"act of denying one's own wishes; refusal to satisfy one's own desires," 1640s, from self- + denial.

Self-denial is to be presumed wise, necessary, or benevolent, unless indication is given to the contrary ; it may be the denial of selfishness; it may be not only the refusal to take what one might have, but the voluntary surrender of what one has ; it may be an act, a habit, or a principle. [Century Dictionary]

Related: Self-denier; self-denying (adj.) is by 1630s as "involving self-denial," also "characterized by or involving denial of one's self."

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cart-way (n.)
also cartway, "road on which carts may travel," mid-14c., from cart (n.) + way (n.).
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stopgap (n.)

also stop-gap, 1680s, from stop (v.) + gap (n.); the notion probably being of something that plugs a leak, but it may be in part from gap (n.) in a specific military sense "opening or breach in defenses by which attack may be made" (1540s). Also as an adjective from 1680s.

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immutability (n.)

1590s, from Latin immutabilitas "unchangeableness," from immutabilis "unchangeable" (see immutable).

Nought may endure but Mutability. [Shelley]
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undertake (v.)
c. 1200, "to entrap;" c. 1300, "to set about (to do)," from under + take (v.). Similar formation in French entreprendre "to undertake," from entre "between, among" + prendre "to take." The under in this word may be the same one that also may form the first element of understand. Old English had underniman "to trap, accept" (cognate with Dutch ondernemen, German unternehmen).
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marketable (adj.)

"that may be sold, salable, fit for the market," c. 1600, from market (v.) + -able. Related: Marketably; marketability.

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generable (adj.)
mid-15c., "capable of being begotten, that may be produced," from Latin generabilis, from generare "to bring forth" (see generation).
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peep-hole (n.)

"hole or crevice through which one may peep or look," 1680s, from peep (v.1) + hole (n.).

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