Etymology
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constipated (adj.)

"having difficulty evacuating the bowels while they are filled or crammed with fecal matter," 1530s, past-participle adjective from constipate (v.).

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mispunctuate (v.)

"punctuate (written matter) erroneously or incorrectly," by 1843, from mis- (1) "badly, wrongly" + punctuate (v.). Related: Mispunctuated; mispunctuating; mispunctuation (1812).

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uninformed (adj.)

1590s, from un- (1) "not" + past participle of inform. Originally in reference to some specific matter or subject; general sense of "uneducated, ignorant" is recorded from 1640s.

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vaccine (n.)

"matter used in vaccination," 1846, from French vaccin, noun use of adjective, from Latin vaccina, fem. of vaccinus "pertaining to a cow" (see vaccination). Related: Vaccinal; vaccinic.

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whatever (pron.)

mid-14c., "what in the world," emphatic of what, with ever. From late 14c. as "anything at all; all of; no matter what or who." From late 14c. as an adjective, "any sort of, any, every; no matter what, regardless of what." From 1870 as "whatever may be the cause, at any event," which could be the source of the modern teen slang dismissive use, which Partridge dates to 1989.

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biolysis (n.)

1865, "the destruction of life," later more specifically "dissolution of a living organism, resolution of a dead organism into its constituent matter" (1880s); see bio- + -lysis. Related: Biolytic.

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materially (adv.)

late 14c., "with, in, by, or with reference to matter or material things," from material (adj.) + -ly (2). Sense of "to an important extent or degree, essentially" is from 1650s.

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hereabout (adv.)

"about this, with regard to this matter," c. 1200, from here + about. Meaning "in the vicinity, near here" is from early 13c. Hereabouts, with adverbial genitive -s-, is from 1580s.

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putridity (n.)

"corruption, rottenness, putrid matter," 1630s, from Medieval Latin putriditas, from Latin putridus (see putrid). In this sense Middle English had putrede (c. 1400).

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coprolite (n.)

"fossil dung, hard, roundish stony mass consisting of petrified fecal matter," 1829, from copro- + -lite, from French, for -lithe, from Greek lithos "stone" (see litho-). Related: Coprolitic.

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