Etymology
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tipsy (adj.)

1570s, from tip (v.1); compare drowsy, flimsy, tricksy. Later associated with tipple. Tipsy-cake (1806) was stale cake saturated with wine or liquor.

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corkage (n.)

"the corking or uncorking of bottles," specifically in reference to a charge by hotel-keepers, etc., for serving wine and liquor not furnished by the house, 1838, from cork (v.) + -age.

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rack (v.2)

"to draw off (wine, etc.) from the lees; draw off, as pure liquor, from sediment," late 15c., rakken, from Old French raquer, rëechier, rëequier which is of uncertain origin. Related: Racked, racking.

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sling (n.2)

sweetened, flavored liquor drink, 1792, American English, a word of unknown origin; perhaps from the notion of "throw back" a drink (see sling (v.1)), or from German schlingen "to swallow." In 19c. also a verb, "to drink slings."

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buttery (n.)

"place for storing liquor," also "room where provisions are laid up" (late 14c.), from Old French boterie, from Late Latin botaria, from bota, variant of butta "cask, bottle;" see butt (n.2) + -ery.

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lees (n.)

"dregs, sediment of wine or any liquor," late 14c., from Old French lies, plural of lie "dregs, sediment," which is probably from Celtic *leg-ya- (compare Old Irish lige "a bed, a lying"), from PIE root *legh- "to lie down, lay."

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shebeen (n.)

"cabin where unlicensed liquor is sold and drunk," 1781, chiefly in Ireland and Scotland, from Irish seibin "small mug," also "bad ale," diminutive of seibe "mug, bottle, liquid measure." The word immigrated and persisted in South African and West Indian English.

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fix (n.)

"position from which it is difficult to move," 1809, American English, from fix (v.). Meaning "dose of narcotic" is from 1934, shortened from fix-up (1867, originally in reference to liquor). Meaning "reliable indication of the position of a ship, plane, etc." (by reference to fixed positions) is from 1902.

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citronella (n.)

1858 in reference to a type of fragrant grass, and especially to the oil it yields, from French citronelle "lemon liquor," from citron (see citrus). Originally an Asiatic grass used in perfumes and soaps, later applied to a substance found in lemon oil, etc. Related: Citronellic.

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gruel (n.)

late 12c., "meal or flour made of beans, lentils, etc.," from Old French gruel "fine meal" (Modern French gruau), a diminutive form from Frankish *grut or another Germanic source, cognate with Middle Dutch grute "coarse meal, malt;" Middle High German gruz "grain," from PIE *ghreu- "to rub, grind" (see grit (n.)). Meaning "thin porridge or soup" is late 14c.

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