Etymology
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yang (n.)

masculine or positive principle in Chinese philosophy, 1670s, from Mandarin yang, said to mean "male, daylight, solar," or "sun, positive, male genitals."

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adenine (n.)

crystalline base, 1885, coined by German physiologist/chemist Albrecht Kossel from Greek adēn "gland" (see adeno-) + chemical suffix -ine (2). So called because it was derived from the pancreas of an ox.

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inguinal (adj.)

1680s, from French inguinal (16c.) or directly from Latin inguinalis "of the groin," from inguen (genitive inguinis) "groin," from PIE *engw- "groin; internal organ" (which is perhaps also the source of Greek adēn "gland"). Related: Inguinally.

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cookee (n.)

"male assistant to a (male) cook in a lumber camp, etc.," 1846, American English, from cook (n.) + diminutive ending.

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goiter (n.)

"morbid enlargement of the thyroid gland," 1620s, from French goitre (16c.), from Rhône dialect, from Old Provençal goitron "throat, gullet," from Vulgar Latin *gutturiosum or *gutturionem, from Latin guttur "throat" (see guttural). Related: Goitrous.

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machismo (n.)

"male virility, masculine pride," 1940, from American Spanish machismo, from Spanish macho "male" (see macho) + ismo (see -ism).

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castrato (n.)

"male person emasculated during childhood to prevent the change of voice at puberty, artificial male soprano," 1763, from Italian castrato, from Latin castratus (see castration). "The voice of such a person, after arriving at adult age, combines the high range and sweetness of the female with the power of the male voice" [Century Dictionary].

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Rom 

"male Gypsy," 1841, see Romany.

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thyroxine (n.)

active principle of the thyroid gland, 1915, from thyro-, combining form of thyroid, + oxy- (apparently a reference to the oxygen atom present in it, but OED has it as a shortening of oxy-indol) + chemical suffix -ine (2), denoting an amino acid.

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pard (n.1)

archaic form of leopard, c. 1300, parde, from Latin pardus "a male panther," from Greek pardos "male panther," from the same source (probably Iranian) as Sanskrit prdaku-s "leopard, tiger, snake," and Persian palang "panther."

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