Etymology
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workaround (n.)
also work-around, by 1987, from the verbal phrase, from work (v.) + around (adv.).
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operand (n.)

in mathematics, "a quantity or symbol to be operated on," 1886, from Latin operandum, neuter gerundive of operari "to work, labor" (in Late Latin "to have effect, be active, cause"), from opera "work, effort," related to opus (genitive operis) "a work" (from PIE root *op- "to work, produce in abundance").

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boondoggle (n.)
"A trivial, useless, or unnecessary undertaking; wasteful expenditure" [OED], 1935, American English, of uncertain origin, popularized during the New Deal as a contemptuous word for make-work projects for the unemployed. Said to have been a pioneer word for "gadget;" it also was by 1932 a Boy Scout term for a kind of woven braid.
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figure (v.)
late 14c., "to represent" (in painting or sculpture), "make a likeness," also "to have a certain shape or appearance," from Old French figurer, from Latin figurare "to form, shape" (from PIE root *dheigh- "to form, build"). Meaning "to shape into" is c. 1400; from mid-15c. as "to cover or adorn with figures." Meaning "to picture in the mind" is from c. 1600. Intransitive meaning "make an appearance, make a figure, show oneself" is from c. 1600. Meaning "work out a sum" (by means of arithmetical figures) is from 1833, American English; hence colloquial sense "to calculate upon, expect" (1837). Related: Figured; figuring.
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artwork (n.)
also art-work, 1847, from art (n.) + work (n.). Perhaps modeled on German Kunstwerk.
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rework (v.)

"to work (something) again or anew," 1842, from re- "again" + work (v.). Related: Reworked; reworking.

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meshwork (n.)

also mesh-work, "a network, a web, a plexus," 1830, from mesh (n.) + work (n.). Compare network.

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mosaic (n.)

c. 1400, "process of making patterns of inlaid work in hard materials," from Old French mosaicq "mosaic work," from Italian mosaico, from Medieval Latin musaicum "mosaic work, work of the Muses," noun use of neuter of musaicus "of the Muses," from Latin Musa (see Muse). Medieval mosaics often were dedicated to the Muses.

The word was formed in Medieval Latin as though from Greek, but the (late) Greek word for "mosaic work" was mouseion (and Klein says this sense in Greek was borrowed from Latin). Meaning "a piece of mosaic work" is from 1690s. Figurative meaning "anything resembling a mosaic work in composition" is by 1640s. As an adjective in English, "made of small pieces inlaid to form a pattern," from 1580s. Related: Mosaicist.

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scrollwork (n.)

"ornamental work in which scrolls or scroll-like lines figure," 1822, from scroll (n.) + work (n.).

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workstation (n.)
also work-station, 1950, from work (n.) + station (n.). Computer sense is from 1972.
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