Etymology
Advertisement
clock-maker (n.)

"one who makes clocks," mid-15c., from clock (n.1) + maker.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
cabinet-maker (n.)
"one whose occupation is the making of household furniture," 1680s, from cabinet + maker.
Related entries & more 
expiatory (adj.)

"having the power to make atonement," 1540s, from Late Latin expiatorius, from expiat-, past-participle stem of Latin expiare "make amends" (see expiation).

Related entries & more 
mad (v.)

"make furious, enrage," also "be out of one's mind," late 14c., from Old English gemædan "make insane" (see mad (adj.)).

Related entries & more 
dumb (v.)

late Old English, adumbian, "to become mute, be silent, keep still," from dumb (adj.). From c. 1600 as "to make mute." Related: Dumbed; dumbing. To dumb (something) down "make less intellectually challenging, make simpler to understand" is from 1933.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
confect (v.)

"to make up or compound," especially "to make into sweetmeats," late 14c., from Latin confectus, past participle of conficere "to prepare," from assimilated form of com "with" (see con-) + combining form of facere "to make, to do" (from PIE root *dhe- "to set, put"). Related: Confected; confecting.

Related entries & more 
simplify (v.)
1650s, from French simplifier "to make simpler" (15c.), from Medieval Latin simplificare "to simplify," from Latin simplex "simple" (see simplex) + combining form of facere "to make" (from PIE root *dhe- "to set, put"). Meaning "to make easier to do" is from 1759. Related: Simplified; simplifying.
Related entries & more 
aggravate (v.)

1520s, "make heavy, burden down," from Latin aggravatus, past participle of aggravare "to render more troublesome," literally "to make heavy or heavier, add to the weight of," from ad "to" (see ad-) + gravare "weigh down," from gravis "heavy" (from PIE root *gwere- (1) "heavy"). The literal sense in English has become obsolete; meaning "to make a bad thing worse" is from 1590s; colloquial sense "exasperate, annoy" is from 1610s. The earlier English verb was aggrege "make heavier or more burdensome; make more oppressive; increase, intensify" (late 14c.), from Old French agreger.

To aggravate has properly only one meaning — to make (an evil) worse or more serious. [Fowler]
Related entries & more 
legitimate (v.)
"establish the legitimacy of, make lawful," 1590s, from Medieval Latin legitimatus, past participle of legitimare "make lawful" (see legitimate (adj.)). Related: Legitimated; legitimating.
Related entries & more 
urbanize (v.)
1640s, "to make more civil;" 1884 "to make into a city," from urban + -ize; in the latter sense from French urbaniser (1873). Related: Urbanized; urbanizing.
Related entries & more 

Page 5