Etymology
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mainframe (n.)
"central processor of a computer system," 1964, from main (adj.) + frame (n.).
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nave (n.1)

"main part of a church," the middle part, lengthwise, extending typically from the main entrance to the choir or chancel, 1670s, from Medieval Latin navem (nominative navis) "nave of a church," a special use of Latin navis "ship" (from PIE root *nau- "boat"), on some fancied resemblance in shape.

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cross-town (adj.)

also crosstown, "lying, leading, or going across town," 1865, in reference to New York City street railways, from cross- + town.

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STP (n.)
commercial motor oil additive, probably an initialism (acronym) of scientifically treated petroleum. As the street name of a type of psychedelic drug, attested from 1967.
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Forbes 
U.S. financial publication, founded 1917 by Scottish-born Wall Street journalist B.C. Forbes (1880-1954) and publisher Walter Drey.
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avenue (n.)

c. 1600, "a way of approach" (originally a military word), from French avenue "way of access" (16c.), from Old French avenue "act of approaching, arrival," noun use of fem. of avenu, past participle of avenir "to come to, arrive," from Latin advenire "to come to, reach, arrive at," from ad "to" (see ad-) + venire "to come" (from a suffixed form of PIE root *gwa- "to go, come").

The meaning was extended to "a way of approach to a country-house," usually a straight path bordered by trees, hence, "a broad, tree-lined roadway" (1650s), then to "wide, main street" (by 1846, especially in U.S.). By late 19c. in U.S. cities it was used to form the names of streets without reference to character.

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Moluccas 

island group of Indonesia, the Spice Islands, attested in French by 1520s as Moluques, from Malay Maluku "main (islands)," from molok "main, chief," perhaps so called for their central location in the archipelago.

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Fiji 
of uncertain origin, considered in Room to be probably a variant of Viti, main island of the group.
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satay (n.)

Indonesian dish consisting of spicy bits or balls of meat grilled or barbecued on skewers, a popular street food, 1934, from Malay or Javanese (Austronesian) satai.

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sadly (adv.)

c. 1300, "heavily," also "solidly," from sad + -ly (2). The main modern meaning "sorrowfully" begins by mid-14c.

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