Etymology
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Dictaphone (n.)

dictation recording and reproduction machine, trademarked by the Columbia Graphophone Company in 1907; from dictation + -phone. A separate company from 1923.

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magneto-electric (adj.)

also magnetoelectric, 1831, "characterized by electricity produced by magnets," from magneto- + electric. Magneto-electric machine is from 1831.

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ATM (n.)
1976, acronym for automated teller machine (1974), which was developed in modern form c. 1968. See teller.
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printing (adj.)

present-participle adjective from print (v.). Printing press "machine for taking impression from an inked surface upon paper" is from 1580s.

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loom (n.)
weaving machine, early 13c. shortening of Old English geloma "utensil, tool," from ge-, perfective prefix, + -loma, an element of unknown origin (compare Old English andloman (plural) "apparatus, article of furniture"). Originally "implement or tool of any kind" (as in heirloom); thus, "the penis" (c. 1400-1600). Specific meaning "a machine in which yarn or thread is woven into fabric" is from c. 1400.
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laundromat (n.)
"automatic coin-operated public laundry," 1946, originally (1942) a proprietary name by Westinghouse for a type of automatic washing machine; from laundry + ending probably suggested by automat. Earlier words for public clothes-washing places in U.S. were washateria (1935), laundrette (1945). Launderette is from 1947. The Westinghouse machine was popular after World War II and was available with coin chutes and timers.
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ballista (n.)
ancient war engine used for throwing missiles, late 14c., from Latin ballista, literally "a throwing machine," from Greek ballein "to throw" (from PIE root *gwele- "to throw, reach").
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opener (n.)

"one who or that which opens," Old English openere, agent noun from open (v.). As "a tool or machine used in opening," c. 1600.

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Maxim 

single-barreled water-cooled machine gun, 1885 (Maxim gun), named for inventor, U.S.-born British engineer Sir Hiram S. Maxim (1840-1916).

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oil-mill (n.)

"a crushing- or grinding-machine for expressing oil from seeds, fruits, nuts, etc.," early 15c., from oil (n.) + mill (n.1).

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