Etymology
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forfeiture (n.)
mid-14c., "loss of property as punishment for a crime, debt, etc.," from Old French forfaiture "crime, transgression; penalty for committing a crime" (12c.), from forfait (see forfeit (n.)).
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comeback (n.)

also come-back, 1889 as "verbal retort," from the verbal phrase; see come + back (adv.). Meaning "recovery, return to former position or condition after retirement or loss" is attested from 1908, American English.

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gash (v.)
1560s, alteration of older garsh, from Middle English garsen (late 14c.), from Old North French garser "to cut, slash" (see gash (n.)). For loss of -r-, see ass (n.2). Related: Gashed; gashing.
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paralysis (n.)

1520s, "impairment of the normal action of the nervous system in bringing body parts or organs into action," from Latin paralysis, from Greek paralysis "paralysis, palsy," literally "loosening," from paralyein "disable, enfeeble," from para- "beside" (see para- (1)) + lyein "loosen, untie" (from PIE root *leu- "to loosen, divide, cut apart"). Figurative meaning "loss of energy, loss of the power of performing regular functions" is from 1813. Earlier form was paralysie (late 14c., see palsy). Old English equivalent was lyft adl (see left (adj.)) or crypelnes "crippleness."

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anosmia (n.)

"loss of sense of smell," 1811, Modern Latin, from Greek an- "not, without" (see an- (1)) + osmē "smell" (Doric odmē), from *odsme, from PIE root *hed- "to smell" (see odor) + abstract noun ending -ia.

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presbycousis (n.)

"loss of hearing acuteness due to age," 1890, medical Latin (by 1886 in German), from Greek presbys "old man; elderly, aged" (see presby-) + akousis "hearing," from akouein "to hear" (see acoustic).

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dismay (n.)

c. 1300, dismai, "consternation, fear, sudden or complete loss of courage, terrified amazement," from dismay (v.) or else from Old French esmai on the same pattern that formed the English verb.

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venture (v.)

early 15c., "to risk the loss" (of something), shortened form of aventure, itself a form of adventure. General sense of "to dare, to presume" is recorded from 1550s. Related: Ventured; venturing.

Nought venter nought have [Heywood, "Proverbs," 1546]
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adventure (v.)
Origin and meaning of adventure
c. 1300, aventuren, "to risk the loss of," from Old French aventurer (12c.) "wander, travel; seek adventure; happen by chance," from aventure (n.); see adventure (n.). Meaning "take a chance" is early 14c. Related: Adventured; adventuring.
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depersonalization (n.)

also depersonalisation, "loss of personality, a treating as though not having a personal identity," 1893, noun of action from depersonalize "regard as not individually personal;" see de- "do the opposite of" +  personalize. Related: Depersonalized; depersonalizing.

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