Etymology
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self-styled (adj.)

"called by oneself," hence, "pretended, would-be," 1823, from self- + past participle of style (v.).

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self-begotten (adj.)

"generated without aid of another," 1670s (Milton); see self- + begotten.

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self-analysis (n.)

"analysis by or of oneself," 1860; see self- + analysis.

Trying to define yourself is like trying to bite your own teeth. [attributed to Alan Watts, who did often use the image in this sense in his talks, if not in these exact words]
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self-heal (n.)

late Old English sylfhele, applied to several plants held to have remarkable healing properties; see self- + heal (v.). So called for supposedly enabling one to heal without a physician's aid.

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self-hatred (n.)

"hatred of oneself," especially when contrasted with one's own ideal self, by 1670s; see self- + hatred. Self-hate (n.) is attested by 1947.

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self-reproach (n.)

"condemning of oneself," 1754; see self- + reproach (n.). Related: Self-reproaching; self-reproachingly.

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self-sufficiency (n.)

"inherent fitness for all ends and purposes and independence of others," 1620s, originally also an attribute of God (translating Greek autakreia); see self + sufficiency. Of mortals, "ability to supply one's own needs," it is implied by 1580s (compare self-sufficient). Sometimes formerly also "an overweening opinion of one's talent or worth" (1690s).

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self-interest (n.)

"regard to or pursuit of private interest, advantage to oneself," 1640s, from self- + interest (n.). Especially "selfishness, pursuit of egotistical interests to the exclusion of regard for others." Related: Self-interested, "characterized by self-interest" (1650s); self-interestedness.

[Self-interest] is a doctrine not very lofty, but clear and sure. It does not seek to attain great objects; but it attains those it aims for without too much effort. ... [It] does not produce great devotion; but it suggests little sacrifices each day; by itself it cannot make a man virtuous; but it forms a multitude of citizens who are regulated, temperate, moderate, farsighted, masters of themselves; and if it does not lead directly to virtue through the will, it brings them near to it insensibly through habits. [Alexis de Tocqueville, "Democracy in America"]
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self-possession (n.)

"command of one's emotions or powers, presence of mind, calmness," 1734, from self- + possession (n.). Related: Self-possessed. Self-collected for "in command of one's emotions" is from 1711.

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self-preservation (n.)

"preservation of oneself from destruction or injury," especially as an instinct or natural law, 1610s; see self- + preservation.

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