Etymology
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Rwanda 

African nation, by 1834, Ruanda, probably via French, named for indigenous people there, whose word for themselves is of unknown origin. The spelling with -w- seems to have predominated after c. 1970.

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Chad 

African nation, former French colony (Tchad), independent since 1960, named for Lake Chad, which is from a local word meaning "lake, large expanse of water." An ironic name for such a desert country. Related: Chadian.

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Bosnia 
named for the River Bosna, which is perhaps from an Indo-European root *bhog- "current." As a name or adjective for someone there, Bosniac (1756, from Russian Bosnyak) is older in English than Bosnian (1788).
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Tex 
nickname for a Texan, by 1903, from Texas.
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Krugerrand (n.)
also Kruger rand, 1967, South African gold coin (issued for investment purposes) bearing a portrait of Transvaal President Stephanus Johannes Paulus Kruger (1825-1904); second element is rand, unit of decimal currency introduced in Republic of South Africa 1961, named for The Rand, gold-mining area in Transvaal, short for Witwatersrand (see rand).
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Seneca 

1610s, from Dutch Sennecas, collective name for the Iroquois tribes of what became upper New York, of uncertain origin, perhaps from a Mahican name for the Oneida or their village. Earlier sinnekens, senakees; the form of the English word probably was influenced by the name of the ancient Roman philosopher. The name sometimes was used by Americans for all the Iroquois.

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Gouda 
type of cheese, 1885, named for a town in Holland.
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Mac 

casual, generic term of address for a man, 1928, from Irish and Gaelic mac, a common element in Scottish and Irish names (literally "son of;" see Mac-); hence used generally from 1650s for "a Celtic Irishman."

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Nicaragua 

central American republic, named for the region, visited 1522 by Spanish conquistador Gil González Dávila, who is said to have named it for a local native chieftain, Nicarao, with Spanish agua "water." Related: Nicaraguan.

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Teletex (n.)
proprietary name for a computer data-sharing network, 1978.
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