Etymology
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long pig (n.)

"human being eaten as food," by 1848, in stories from the Fiji Islands, said to be a literal rendering of a local term, in one version puaka balava.

Bau literally stank for many days, human flesh having been cooked in every house, and the entrails thrown outside as food for pigs, or left to putrefy in the sun. The Somosomo people were fed with human flesh during their stay at Bau, they being on a visit at that time; and some of the Chiefs of other towns, when bringing their food, carried a cooked human being on one shoulder, and a pig on the other; but they always preferred the "long pig," as they call a man when baked. ["FEEJEE.—Extract of a Letter from the Rev. John Watsford, dated Ono, October 6th, 1846." in "Wesleyan Missionary Notices," Sept. 1847]
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lifelong (adj.)
also life-long, "continuing a lifetime," 1855, from life (n.) + long (adj.).
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overlong (adv.)

also over-long, mid-13c., "for too long a time," from over- + long (adv.).

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longanimity (n.)
"patience," mid-15c., from Late Latin longanimitas, from longanimus "long-suffering, patient," from longus "long, extended" (see long (adj.)) + animus "soul, spirit, mind" (see animus).
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daylong (adj.)

also day-long, "lasting all day," Old English dæglang; see day + long (adj.).

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long johns (n.)
type of long, warm underwear, 1943, originally made for U.S. GIs in World War II. Earlier as the name of a type of pastry (1919). Also used of sorts of worm, potato, table, sled, etc.
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nightlong (adj.)

"for the period of a night," Middle English nightlonge, from Old English nihtlang; see night + -long.

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sidelong (adv.)

"toward the side," 1570s, alteration of Middle English sidlyng (see sidle), probably by influence of side (n.) + long (adj.). As an adjective from 1590s.

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overlong (adj.)

early 14c., of text, "too lengthy, requiring too much time, very tedious;" from over- + long (adj.). From late 14c. as "lasting too long." Middle English had also overshort "too short, too brief."

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longing (n.)

"yearning, eager desire, craving," Old English langung "longing, weariness, sadness, dejection," verbal noun from long (v.).

2. Specifically, in pathol., one of the peculiar and often whimsical desires experienced by pregnant women. [Century Dictionary, 1899]
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