Etymology
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bionomy (n.)

"science of the laws of life, or of living functions," 1853, in books on Comte's philosophy, from bio- "life" + -nomy "rule, law." Related: Bionomic.

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lechery (n.)
"lewdness in living, habitual lustful indulgence," c. 1200, from Old French lecherie "gluttony, sensuality, lewdness," from lecheor "debauched man" (see lecher).
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breadwinner (n.)
also bread-winner, "one who supplies a living for himself and others," especially a family, 1821, from the noun bread (probably in a literal sense) + winner, from win (v.) in its sense of "struggle for, work at." Attested slightly earlier (1818) in sense "skill or art by which one makes a living." Not too far removed from the image at the root of lord (n.).
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life-size (adj.)
"of the same size as the (living) original," 1820, from life (n.) + size (n.). Life-sized in the same sense is from 1847.
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dybbuk (n.)
"malevolent spirit of a dead person possessing the body of a living one," 1903, from Jewish folklore, from Hebrew dibbuk, from dabak "to cling, cleave to."
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canon (n.2)
"clergyman living according to rules," c. 1200 (late 12c. as a surname), from Anglo-French canun, from Old North French canonie (Modern French chanoine), from Church Latin canonicus "clergyman living under a rule," noun use of Latin adjective canonicus "according to rule" (in ecclesiastical use, "pertaining to the rules or institutes of the church canonical"), from Greek kanonikos, from kanon "rule" (see canon (n.1)).
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livable (adj.)
also liveable, "suitable for living in," 1814 ("Mansfield Park"), from live (v.) + -able. Attested earlier in a now-obsolete sense "likely to survive" (1610s).
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fresh-water (adj.)

also freshwater, "pertaining to, produced by, living in, or situated on water that is not salt," 1520s, from fresh (adj.1) + water (n.1).

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hexiology (n.)

"history of the development and behavior of living beings as affected by their environment," 1882, coined by English biologist St. George Jackson Mivart (1827-1900) from Greek hexis "a state or habit," from ekhein "to have, hold;" in intransitive use, "be in a given state or condition" (from PIE root *segh- "to hold").

Every living creature has also relations with other living creatures, which may tend to destroy it, or indirectly to aid it, and the various physical forces and conditions exercise their several influences upon it. The study of all these complex relations to time, space, physical forces, other organisms, and to surrounding conditions generally, constitutes the science of hexicology (hexiology?). [Mivart]
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animal (n.)

early 14c., "any sentient living creature" (including humans), from Latin animale "living being, being which breathes," noun use of neuter of animalis (adj.) "animate, living; of the air," from anima "breath, soul; a current of air" (from PIE root *ane- "to breathe;" compare deer). A rare word in English before c. 1600, and not in KJV (1611). Commonly only of non-human creatures. It drove out the older beast in common usage. Used derisively of brutish humans (in which the "animal," or non-rational, non-spiritual nature is ascendant) from 1580s.

Quid est homo? A dedlych best and resonable, animal racionale. ["Battlefield Grammar," c. 1450]
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