Etymology
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dying (adj.)

"in the process of becoming dead, decaying from life," mid-15c., present-participle adjective from die (v.).

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horde (v.)
"to live or gather in hordes," 1821, from horde (n.). Related: Horded; hording.
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liver (n.2)
"one who lives (in a particular way)," late 14c., agent noun from live (v.).
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rusticate (v.)

1650s, "to go or retire into the country, live a country life," from Latin rusticatus, past participle of rusticarti "to live in the country," from rusticus (see rustic). In English university slang 18c.-19c., transitive, "to suspend (a student) from studies for a time and send away as punishment." Related: Rusticated; rusticating.

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vivacious (adj.)
1640s, from Latin vivax (genitive vivacis) "lively, vigorous" (from PIE root *gwei- "to live") + -ous. Related: Vivaciously.
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qui vive 

1726, in on the qui vive "on the alert," from French être sur le qui vive "be on the alert," from the phrase qui voulez-vous qui vive? sentinel's challenge, "whom do you wish to live?" In other words "(long) live who?" meaning "whose side are you on?" (The answer might be Vive la France, Vive le roi, etc.). From qui (from Latin qui "who") + vive, third person singular present subjunctive of vivre, from Latin vivere "to live" (see viva).

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vivarium (n.)
c. 1600, "game park," from Latin vivarium "enclosure for live game, park, warren, preserve, fish pond," noun use of neuter singular of vivarius "pertaining to living creatures," from vivus "alive, living" (from PIE root *gwei- "to live"). Meaning "glass bowl for studying living creatures" is from 1853.
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vive (interj.)
1590s (in vive le roi), from French, literally "long live ______!" It is the French equivalent of viva (q.v.). The opposite is à bas "down! down with!" Jocular phrase vive la différence in reference to the difference between men and women is recorded from 1963. Also in vive la bagatelle, literally "long live nonsense," denoting a carefree attitude to life.
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biota (n.)
"animal and plant life of a given region," 1901, from Greek biota "life," from PIE root *gwei- "to live."
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lifelike (adj.)
1610s, "likely to live," from life (n.) + like (adj.). Meaning "exactly like the living original" is from 1725.
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