Etymology
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lightness (n.)
"quality of having little weight," late Old English lihtnesse, from light (adj.1) + -ness.
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oligotrophy (n.)

"deficiency of nutrition," by 1895, from oligo- "small, little" + -trophy "food, nourishment." Related: Oligotrophic.

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Colleen 

fem. proper name, from Irish cailin "a girl, a little girl," diminutive of caile "girl, woman."

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vesicular (adj.)
1715, from Modern Latin vesicularis, from vesicula "little blister," diminutive of vesica "bladder" (see ventral).
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parvovirus (n.)

type of very small virus, 1965, from parvi- "small, little" + connecting element -o- + virus.

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cellular (adj.)

1753, "consisting of or resembling cells," with reference to tissue, from Modern Latin cellularis "of little cells," from cellula "little cell," diminutive of cella "small room" (see cell). Of mobile phone systems (in which the area served is divided into "cells" of a few square miles served by transmitters), 1977. Related: Cellularity.

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paucity (n.)

late 14c., paucite, "smallness of quantity, scantiness;" early 15c., "smallness of number, fewness," from Old French paucité (14c.) and directly from Latin paucitatem (nominative paucitas) "fewness, scarcity, a small number," from paucus "few, little," from PIE *pau-ko-, suffixed form of root *pau- (1) "few, little" (source also of few (adj.)).

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parvanimity (n.)

"state of having a little or ignoble mind," 1690s, from Latin parvus "small" (see parvi-) + ending from magnanimity.

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oliguria (n.)

in pathology, "scantiness of urine," 1843, from oligo- "small, little," + -uria, from Greek ouron "urine" (see urine).

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petit (adj.)

late 14c., "small, little; minor, trifling, insignificant," from Old French petit "small, little, young, few in numbers" (11c.), which is probably from the stem of Late Latin pitinnus "small," a word of uncertain origin; it corresponds to no known Latin form and perhaps is from a Celtic root pett- "part, piece, bit" also found in Italian pezza, English piece.

Attested as a surname from 1086. Replaced by petty in most usages, except in established forms such as petit bourgeois "conventional middle-class" (1832; used in English by Charlotte Brontë earlier than by Marx or Engels); petit mal ("mild form of epilepsy," 1842, literally "little evil"); petit-maître ("a fop, a dandy," 1711, literally "little master"); and petit four "small, fancy dessert cake" (1884), which in French means "little oven," from Old French four "oven," from Latin furnus. In Middle English a petiteskole (mid-15c.) was a school for young children.

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