Etymology
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subtext (n.)
"underlying theme of a work of literature," 1950, from sub- + text (n.). Originally a term in Konstantin Stanislavsky's theory of acting. Earlier it was used in a literal sense of "text appearing below other text on a page" (1726). Latin subtextere meant "to weave under, work in below."
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litterateur (n.)
"a literary man, one whose profession is literature," 1806, from French littérateur, from Latin litterator "a grammarian, philologist," from littera "letter; writing" (see letter (n.1)). Sometimes Englished as literator (1630s), but often with a deprecatory sense. O.W. Holmes used the French fem. form littératrice (1857).
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philologist (n.)

1640s, "literary person, one devoted to learning or literature;" 1716, "student of language," from philology (q.v.) + -ist. Philologer (1580s in the former sense, 1650s in the latter) was formerly more common. Philologue is from 1590s; philologian is by 1830.

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analyze (v.)
c. 1600, of material things, "to dissect, take to pieces," from French analyser, from the noun analyse "analysis" (see analysis). Of literature, "examine critically to get the essence of," from 1610s; meaning in chemistry ("resolve a compound into elements") dates from 1660s. General sense of "to examine closely" dates from 1809; psychological sense is from 1909. Related: Analyzed; analyzing.
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flashback (n.)
also flash-back, 1903 in reference to fires in engines or furnaces, from verbal phrase (1902), from flash (v.) + back (adv.). Movie plot device sense is from 1916. The hallucinogenic drug sense is attested in psychological literature from 1970, which means probably hippies were using it a few years before.
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bibliography (n.)
1670s, "the writing of books," from Greek bibliographia "the writing of books," from biblion "book" (see biblio-) + graphos "(something) drawn or written" (see -graphy). Meaning "the study of books, authors, publications, etc.," is from 1803. Sense of "a list of books that form the literature of a subject" is first attested 1814. Related: Bibliographic.
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formalism (n.)
1840, "strict adherence to prescribed forms," from formal + -ism. Used over the years in philosophy, theology, literature, and art in various senses suggesting detachment of form from content, or spirituality, or meaning; or belief in the sufficiency of formal logic. Related: Formalist.
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god-awful (adj.)
also godawful, according to OED from 1878 as "impressive," 1897 as "impressively terrible," but it seems not to have been much in print before c. 1924, from God + awful. The God might be an intensifier or the whole might be from the frequent God's awful (vengeance, judgment, etc.), a common phrase in religious literature.
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naturalism (n.)

1630s, "action based on natural instincts," from natural (adj.) + -ism. In philosophy, as a view of the world and humanity's relationship to it involving natural forces only (and excluding spiritualism and superstition), from 1750. As a tendency in art and literature, "conformity to nature or reality, but without slavish fidelity to it," from 1850.

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literate (adj.)
"educated, instructed, having knowledge of letters," early 15c., from Latin literatus/litteratus "educated, learned, who knows the letters;" formed in imitation of Greek grammatikos from Latin littera/litera "alphabetic letter" (see letter (n.1)). By late 18c. especially "acquainted with literature." As a noun, "one who can read and write," 1894.
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