Etymology
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potboiler (n.)

also pot-boiler, 1864 in the figurative sense of "literary or artistic work produced hastily and merely for providing the necessities of life," from pot (n.1) + agent noun from boil (v.). The notion is of something one writes solely to "keep the pot boiling," that is, put food on the table.

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dingle (n.)

"deep dell or secluded hollow, usually wooded," c. 1200, of unknown origin; a dialectal word until it entered literary use 17c. The Middle English Compendium compares Old English ding "dungeon," Old High German tunc "cellar," Old Norse dyngja "lady's bower."

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don (v.)

"to put on (articles of clothing)," mid-14c. contraction of do on (compare doff). "After 1650 retained in popular use only in north. dialect; as a literary archaism it has become very frequent in 19th c." [OED]. Related: Donned; donning.

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analects (n.)
1650s, "literary gleanings," from Latin analecta, from Greek analekta, literally "things chosen," neuter plural of analektos "select, choice," verbal adjective of analegein "to gather up, collect," from ana "up" (see ana-) + legein "to gather," also "to choose words," hence "to speak," from PIE root *leg- (1) "to collect, gather."
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afeared (adj.)
Old English afæred, past participle of now-obsolete afear (Old English afæran) "terrify, cause to fear," from a- (1) + færan (see fear (v.)). Used frequently by Shakespeare, but supplanted in literary English after 1700 by afraid (q.v.), to which it has no connection. It survived in popular speech and colloquial writing.
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deboshed (adj.)

1590s, Englished spelling of French pronunciation of debauched "dissolute, seduced or corrupted from morals or purity of character" (see debauch). Obsolete in England after mid-17c., retained in Scotland, and given a revival of sorts by Scott (1826), so that it turns up in 19c. literary works.

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conciseness (n.)

"brevity of statement, expression of much in few words," 1650s, from concise + -ness.

[Conciseness] is the English word familiar to the ordinary man: concision is the LITERARY CRITIC'S WORD, more recent in English, used by writers under French influence & often requiring the reader to stop & think whether he knows its meaning. [Fowler]
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scantly (adv.)

late 14c., scantlie, "frugally, sparingly;" c. 1400, "scarcely, narrowly, hardly at all," from scant (adj.) + -ly (2). OED reports it "Exceedingly common from the 15th to the middle of the 17th c.; in the 18th c. it had app. become obsolete; revived in literary use by Scott."

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ingle (n.1)

"fireplace," c. 1500, from Scottish, usually said to be from Gaelic aingeal "fire, light" ("but there are difficulties" [OED]), a word of uncertain origin. The vogue for Scottish poetry in late 18c. introduced ingleside "fireside" (1747) and ingle-nook,inglenook "corner by the fire" (1773) to literary English.

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litterateur (n.)
"a literary man, one whose profession is literature," 1806, from French littérateur, from Latin litterator "a grammarian, philologist," from littera "letter; writing" (see letter (n.1)). Sometimes Englished as literator (1630s), but often with a deprecatory sense. O.W. Holmes used the French fem. form littératrice (1857).
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