Etymology
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Etheldred 

Anglo-Saxon fem. proper name, Old English Æðelðryð, literally "of noble strength" (see Audrey).

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Zoe 

fem. proper name, Greek, literally "life," from PIE root *gwei- "to live."

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Irian 

Indonesian name for New Guinea, said to mean literally "cloud-covered."

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Boris 

Slavic masc. proper name, literally "fight," from Slavic root *bor- "to fight, overcome" (from PIE root *bhorh- "hole").

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Nehemiah 

masc. proper name, Jewish leader under Persian king Artaxerxes, from Hebrew Nehemyah, literally "the Lord comforts."

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Micmac 

Algonquian tribe of the Canadian Maritimes and Newfoundland, by 1776, from mi:kemaw, a native name said to mean literally "allies."

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Anna 

fem. proper name, from Latin Anna, from Greek Anna, from Hebrew Hannah, literally "grace, graciousness" (see Hannah).

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Tokyo 

so named 1868, from Japanese to "east" + kyo "capital;" its earlier name was Edo, literally "estuary."

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Hilda 

fem. proper name, German, literally "battle-maid," from fem. of Old High German hild "war, battle, fight, combat," from Proto-Germanic *hildiz "battle" (source also of Old English (poetic) hild "war, battle," Old Saxon hild, Old High German hilt, Old Norse hildr), from PIE *keldh-, from root *kel- "to strike, cut" (see holt). Hild-/-hild was a common Germanic name-forming element; compare Hildebrand, Brunhild, Matilda.

Old English hild figured widely in kenning compounds: Hildbedd "deathbed;" hildegicel "blood dripping from a sword," literally "battle-icicle;" hildenædre "arrow, lance, spear," literally "war-adder;" hildesæd "weary of fighting, battle-worn," literally "battle-sad."

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Elijah 

name of the great Old Testament prophet, from Hebrew Elijjah, literally "the Lord is God." The Greek form is Elias.

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