Etymology
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pinocytosis (n.)

"process by which liquid is taken into a cell," 1931, from Greek pinein "to drink" (from PIE root *po(i)- "to drink") + -cytosis.

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benzine (n.)

original name of benzene (q.v.). By 1864 as the name of a different substance, a colorless liquid obtained from the distillation of petroleum.

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fuse (v.)

1680s, "to melt, make liquid by heat" (transitive), back-formation from fusion. Intransitive sense, "to become liquid," attested from 1800. Figurative sense of "blend different things, blend or unite as if by melting together" is recorded by 1817. Intransitive figurative sense "become intermingled or blended" is by 1873. Related: Fused; fusing.

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pool (v.1)

of liquid, "to form a pool or pools," 1620s, from pool (n.1). Earlier, of land, "to be full of pools" (polen, mid-15c.). Related: Pooled; pooling.

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dilute (v.)
Origin and meaning of dilute

1550s, figurative, "to weaken, remove the strength or force of," from Latin dilutus, past participle of diluere "dissolve, wash away, dilute," from dis- "apart" (see dis-) + -luere, combining form of lavere "to wash" (from PIE root *leue- "to wash").

Literal sense of "render more liquid, make more thin or fluid; weaken by admixture of water or other liquid" is from 1660s. Related: Diluted; diluting. As an adjective, "thin, attenuated, reduced in strength," from c. 1600.

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quart (n.)

liquid measure of capacity equal to one-fourth of a gallon, early 14c., from Old French quarte "a fourth part" (13c.), from Latin quarta (pars), fem. of quartus "the fourth, fourth part" (related to quattuor "four," from PIE root *kwetwer- "four").

Compare Latin quartarius "fourth part," also the name of a small liquid measure (the fourth part of a sextarius), which was about the same as an English pint.

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liquefaction (n.)

early 15c., "act or process of becoming liquid," from French liquéfaction, from Late Latin liquefactionem (nominative liquefactio), noun of action from past-participle stem of Latin liquefacere "to make liquid, melt" (see liquefy). Formerly also used in a metaphysical sense, of the melting of the soul in the ardor of devotion. Related: Liquefacient.

Whenas in silks my Julia goes,
Then, then (methinks) how sweetly flows
That liquefaction of her clothes.
[Robert Herrick (1591-1647)]
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sopaipilla (n.)

also sopapilla, by 1983, from Mexican Spanish, ultimately from Old Spanish sopa "food soaked in liquid," from a Germanic source, from Proto-Germanic *sup- (see sup (v.2)).

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squeaky (adj.)

1823, from squeak (n.) + -y (2). Squeaky clean in figurative sense is from 1972, probably from advertisements for dishwashing liquid. Related: Squeakily; squeakiness.

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white-out (n.)

1946 as an extreme snow condition on the U.S. prairie, from white as a verb + out (adv.). From 1977 as a liquid correction for paper.

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